When you, the reader, sit down to analyze a book, you must remember that whatever you choose to say is subjective. It's your opinion and you're entitled to it. Even if it means trashing a widely acknowledged author.

To give everyone the courage to speak their mind, the Facebook page Haters of Goodreads are sharing some of the funniest reviews that have appeared on the literary website.

Calling The Catcher in the Rye "the most overrated 'classic' of all time", refusing to finish Swann's Way due to Proust "discussing the smell of his chamber pot after having eaten asparagus"... It's all there!

#1

The Bible

The Bible

HatersOfGoodreads Report

JuJu
Community Member
1 month ago

NC-17, should not be sold do children

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#2

Crime And Punishment

Crime And Punishment

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troufaki13
Community Member
1 month ago

I thought it was very good

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#3

Of Mice And Men

Of Mice And Men

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Guido Diegoli
Community Member
1 month ago

As much as I love Mice and Men, this comment is hilarious. (Metallica in the background with 'Sad but true'. XD

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If you, however, want to do (and write!) more critical analysis of the books you read, the University Writing Center at Texas A&M University suggests to begin by summarizing the basic plot — this will help ground you in the story.

Then, research the author's background and other work. This can give insight into their perspective and bias, as well as reveal what they might be commenting on. As an example, the University Writing Center mentions Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. It's about a group of friends who embark on an epic journey and fight a great war. But knowing Tolkien fought in the Battle of Somme during World War I and that his closest friends were killed helps explain his sentiments about war.

Other questions about context can stem from the story itself: think about the narrator's personality and their role in the story. Also, it can be a good idea to consider who the narrator is addressing.

#4

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

HatersOfGoodreads Report

Hannah Edwards
Community Member
1 month ago

I blame Aristotle lol

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#5

Romeo And Juliet

Romeo And Juliet

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Daniel Marsh
Community Member
1 month ago

At least this one is a reasoned critique.

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#6

Moby Dick

Moby Dick

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grey galah
Community Member
1 month ago

or...MD is nature, Ahab is human hubris, Ishmael is, well, a prophet...I think the problem are school curriculum deciding the age of students who read these classics.

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Next, we have setting. When and where a story takes place can be of huge importance. Where the author's story is placed? Why the author made that decision?

Many stories would be irretrievably altered if their setting were different and setting is, therefore, vital for interpreting the story's meaning. To illustrate this point, the University Writing Center highlights the setting for Faulkner's work — the American South after the Civil War. It is essential to his overall message. Faulkner's characters are people who can't move on, and through them the author suggests that the South similarly can't get past the Civil War and the wrongs of slavery.

By the way, storylines usually evolve in patterns, so identifying essential plot points might help you to analyze, interpret, and explain the story as well.

#7

Rousseau, The Social Contract

Rousseau, The Social Contract

HatersOfGoodreads Report

MrOwlAteMyMetalWorm.
Community Member
1 month ago

Legit.

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#8

The Metamorphosis

The Metamorphosis

HatersOfGoodreads Report

JuJu
Community Member
1 month ago

But WTF is an excellent summary and would make a sufficient blurb.

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#9

Daniel C. Dennett, "Consciousness Explained"

Daniel C. Dennett, "Consciousness Explained"

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Lauren Caswell
Community Member
1 month ago

It's 42.....sorry, meaning of life, my mistake

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But characters are the driving force behind stories, both the major and the minor ones. Like the above-mentioned Faulkner example suggests, authors can use them to broadcast their most important messages. You won't be able to analyze every character in a book, but pick out several important ones to consider.

For this, you can use the following questions: What are the character's main personality traits and why did the author give him these traits? What is the character's role in the story? What are the character's morals or ethics? Why does the author give him those? Why does the character do what he does? Why did the author make him act that way? What is the character's relationship to other characters and why?

#10

Swann's Way

Swann's Way

HatersOfGoodreads Report

Abhinc
Community Member
1 month ago

as a french man i HAD to study Proust way more often than i would have liked !! i hated it every single time. i just can't stand literature from the 19th century

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#11

Nietzsche, Beyond Good And Evil

Nietzsche, Beyond Good And Evil

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grey galah
Community Member
1 month ago

reading these makes me realise what doesn't kill me makes me stronger...

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#12

Plato, Phaedrus

Plato, Phaedrus

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Abhinc
Community Member
1 month ago

are we saying greek phiosophers are antique influencers ??

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Also, various literary devices help convey meaning or create a mood. Look for allusions, irony, symbolism, and other "tools" in a story to identify key points and their contribution to the author's overall message.

After you've worked on the story for so long, you should start to get a sense of its major themes, the big ideas that authors comment on throughout the work. Common themes are good vs. evil, human nature, religion, social structure, authority, coming-of-age, human rights, and so on. Books typically deal with multiple themes, some more obvious than others.

Once you complete the analysis, develop a thesis that makes an arguable claim about the text — like "wtf?" — and post it on Goodreads.

#13

The Catcher In The Rye

The Catcher In The Rye

HatersOfGoodreads Report

Dash Blue
Community Member
1 month ago

I love Catcher in the Rye! The only book that I have read at least five times. Heck, the only novel that i have read more than twice.

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#14

A Brief History Of Time, By Stephen Hawking

A Brief History Of Time, By Stephen Hawking

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Nadine Debard
Community Member
1 month ago

As a non-physicist I actually enjoyed reading this book because Hawking managed to simplify the main theories and make them understandable. Of course if you don't care about time, space, quantum stuff and relativity theories, it must be a pain in the butt...

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#15

The Old Man And The Sea

The Old Man And The Sea

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Miss Cris
Community Member
1 month ago

Another boring book responsible of all teenagers hating reading. Teachers, parents, people, if you want them to read, make them read good books, not shıt. What did you expect?

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#16

Freud, Introductory Lectures On Psychoanalysis

Freud, Introductory Lectures On Psychoanalysis

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grey galah
Community Member
1 month ago

...because sometimes a cigar ISN'T a cigar...

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#17

Žižek, The Sublime Object Of Ideology

Žižek, The Sublime Object Of Ideology

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Nicholas Kraemer
Community Member
1 month ago

Three stars though.

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#18

Hate Lvls 1, 2 & 3 The Great Gatsby

Hate Lvls 1, 2 & 3 The Great Gatsby

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Skara Brae
Community Member
1 month ago

Ugh. I summarize this book, along with War and Peace, as 'Stupid people doing stupid things'

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#19

Danielewski, House Of Leaves

Danielewski, House Of Leaves

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MrOwlAteMyMetalWorm.
Community Member
1 month ago

DAVID ,you articulate little ....!

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#20

Foucault, Madness & Civilization

Foucault, Madness & Civilization

HatersOfGoodreads Report

grey galah
Community Member
1 month ago

Knowledge is Power kiddo

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#21

Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground

Dostoevsky, Notes From Underground

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Daria B
Community Member
1 month ago

So.... basically.... the comment section of any "serious" article on social media ♡

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#22

Herbert Marcuse, "One-Dimensional Man: Studies In The Ideology Of Advanced Industrial Society"

Herbert Marcuse, "One-Dimensional Man: Studies In The Ideology Of Advanced Industrial Society"

HatersOfGoodreads Report

Bacony Cakes
Community Member
1 month ago

wasn't this the one written by the terrorist or something

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#23

The Gay Science

The Gay Science

HatersOfGoodreads Report

Rando
Community Member
1 month ago (edited)

BTW, gay has four meanings: 1. Homosexual 2. Carefree 3. Brightly Coloured 4. Happy

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#24

Moby Dick

Moby Dick

HatersOfGoodreads Report

Dash Blue
Community Member
1 month ago

I once read that Moby D**k is the most boring classic novel ever written. This is why I have never attempted to read it.

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#25

Kant, Groundwork Of The Metaphysics Of Morals

Kant, Groundwork Of The Metaphysics Of Morals

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Two_rolling_black_eyes
Community Member
1 month ago

Its almost like the book was written 300 years ago and helped kick off an age of enlightenment that allowed us to discuss the very issues he has. Its like saying the Wright Brothers are overrated because their plane only flew 800 feet.

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#26

Murakami, 1q84

Murakami, 1q84

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Skara Brae
Community Member
1 month ago

I understand the reviewer's sentiment. The book starts out like it's the real world, but when it shifts, it's not a lot, but still obvious. One wonders why the main characters don't think anything of it. I liked the book, though. I like stories that are less predictable than usual.

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#27

G.w.f. Hegel, "Elements Of The Philosophy Of Right"

G.w.f. Hegel, "Elements Of The Philosophy Of Right"

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Miss Cris
Community Member
1 month ago

You can't rate Hegel by only reading three pages. Moreover if they're the three first pages. You don't even know what about is the book.

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#28

Capital Vol. I

Capital Vol. I

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sofacushionfort
Community Member
1 month ago

Me too, but since I am the last king and was unable to find the entrails of the last priest, here I remain.

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#29

The Death Of Tragedy (Hamlet)

The Death Of Tragedy (Hamlet)

HatersOfGoodreads Report

Thomas Stead
Community Member
1 month ago

one guy is left, the dude who is now king of 2 kingdoms due to everyone else being popped off.

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#30

The Cloud Of Unknowing

The Cloud Of Unknowing

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Anna McHugh
Community Member
1 month ago

Blimey - try Margery Kempe. There was someone who needed HRT.

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