Going abroad and exploring a new country is an enriching experience. You open your eyes to new cultures and try to see everything as a local would. On the other hand, behavior that you consider normal in your homeland could be seen as a faux-pas somewhere else.

To get an idea on how to avoid such situations, Reddit user u/Alexandervz asked what tourists should know before visiting certain countries—the unwritten, unspoken rules if you will. The internet has delivered once again and people from all over the world gave their answers.

From small nuances that might seem unfamiliar at first, to things that will help you avoid getting arrested, there’s a wealth of insights from a range of countries and cultures. Bored Panda has collected the cream of the crop, so vote for your favorites and try to remember them for your next trip!

#1

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About In Cuba it often looks like there's no line, but there is. It's called "el ultimo". When you arrive somewhere you ask "el ultimo?" and whoever is last in line raises their hand. You are now "el ultimo" and you just know who is in front of you. In the meantime you can sit down in some shade.

mmmkeyboards , Pedro Szekely Report

Beeps
Community Member
3 months ago

What a great concept!

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As the world has become a more connected place, finding out about somewhere has become easier than ever. A quick online search for a country will inundate you with photos of the land, its people, outfits, food, and much more. This is all just a few clicks away, not a plane ride and a couple of thousand miles away. 

However, nothing compares to visiting a place for yourself. Photos and videos can only replicate the sights and sounds of being somewhere else. Living and feeling it for yourself is an awesome sensory experience, and a personal one too. 

#2

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Scandinavia - You don't talk about religion. Got one? Good for you, but that's nothing to bring up/discuss.

Qzy , Kate Kalvach Report

Michelle M
Community Member
3 months ago

And Czech too. Probably makes their lives easier.

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It’s incredibly refreshing to see everything from a new perspective and educate yourself on the wider world around us. With so many different cultures spanning the five continents, you could spend your whole life just seeing how others live their own lives.

Many people feel the same way and have committed themselves to do exactly that. Whether it’s for bringing a wider focus to small stories or simply for their own growth, sharing experiences through travel is a deeply rewarding experience.

#3

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About We are not trying to be rude, we just don't do small talk. - Finland

real_actual_doctor Report

Robert T
Community Member
3 months ago

Sounds like my kind of country :D

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#4

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Mainland China: Do not buy traditional Chinese silk clothes and from a shop also sells wreath. (no matter how beautiful they are) Those clothes are for dead people, and that shop is a shroud shop. You have no idea how horrifying to se a foreigner wearing them and walking down the street.

rustyhalo93 Report

Miss Cris
Community Member
3 months ago

Oh, that's important! For me it also would be horrible to know I'm dressed like a dead woman at her own funeral. Thank you !!!

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But to get the most out of it, you need to open yourself up to new possibilities and shake off your unconscious biases. Your notions about life could be vastly different from how others in your chosen destination see the world.

#5

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Ireland: Seriously, no one cares if you have an Irish great aunt twice removed, that absolutely does not make you Irish, and it's pretty insulting to claim otherwise.

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Karl Baxter
Community Member
3 months ago

Amen to that 😎

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#6

England

Don't talk to people on the tube. Got that? The tube is as sacred to us as the shower; it is where we reminisce about our pasts in complete silence. It is a memorial to fallen dreams, a cemetery of missed opportunities, but most of all it is a sanctuary of regret. And you will treat it like a library; Sit down, shut the f**k up, read a f**king book and ignore the tears rolling down the face of the person next to you.

Don't tell anybody born north of Birmingham that Thatcher "wasn't all that bad".

We can complain about how s**te our country is all we want, but you're not allowed to. We won't protest too loudly about it and probably won't even say anything, but inside we're consulting our in-brain thesaurus for things to put in the strongly-worded letter we're going to write, expressing our discontent at your behaviour.

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Natalie
Community Member
3 months ago

Do NOT jump the queue. People will be disgusted with you for years.

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So, when you’re a guest in another country, it’s important to remember that you’re exactly that—a guest. And this means being respectful to your hosts. Understanding the local customs will help you go a long way, so to speak, and your respect will be reciprocated. Eventually, you’ll adjust and be able to see a country just as the locals do.

On this, Dr. Asim Shah, a professor of psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine, said, “By learning about people of different cultural backgrounds, you can increase your horizons. If you put aside any prejudices or biases you might have and you are open to other people, it can help prepare you to listen, talk and learn about other people and their cultures.”

#7

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Finland: Do not go too near anyone. Our personal space is huge.

-manabreak , Giuseppe Milo Report

Goth mouse (they/them)
Community Member
3 months ago

I need to live here!!!

DKS 001
Community Member
3 months ago

me too. Introvert heaven!

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Allan Breum
Community Member
3 months ago

Reminds me of that Covid joke: The fins can't wait until this whole staying 2 meters from each other is done with, so they can go back to their normal 20 meters.

Tiny Dynamine
Community Member
3 months ago

Hehe!

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Aroace tiger (any pronouns)
Community Member
3 months ago

Yes please

Saara-Elina Kaukiainen
Community Member
3 months ago

Also, never touch a Finn without permission. It is super rude. :)

June
Community Member
3 months ago

Now I want to move to Finland

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Erin Pritchard
Community Member
3 months ago

Sounds like my kind of place

Gwen
Community Member
3 months ago

Social distancing before, during, and after Covid!

Hannu Luhtasela
Community Member
3 months ago

Yeah, it was easy to adapt with Covid restrictions :)

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Kat
Community Member
3 months ago

Same in Estonia. We sure love distance. Hopefully this covid thing ends soon and we can go back to our usual 5 meter distance instead of 2 that's now required.

Kathryn Baylis
Community Member
3 months ago

So is mine. Finland sounds like a country I could like a lot.

Ancsuri
Community Member
3 months ago

I like Finland, visited once, and I am absolutely in love

Victor
Community Member
3 months ago

I must be a Finish trapped inside a non-Finish body.

lara
Community Member
3 months ago

No wonder you threw the Red Army out of Finland. They are always too close.

Daria Z
Community Member
3 months ago

Perfect! Just the way I like it :D

Kristi Yagwit
Community Member
3 months ago

This is all I want in life. How wonderful would it be to visit a grocer without being harassed by strangers!

urszulat
Community Member
3 months ago

Sounds good to me.

Analyn Lahr
Community Member
3 months ago

Sounds wonderful and peaceful.

Alexia
Community Member
3 months ago

I wanna move there. Really. I could even get used to the cold, dark days.

Ivy la Sangrienta
Community Member
3 months ago

How about the month of 24/7 sun we have in the summer? It can be disorienting.

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Martha Meyer
Community Member
3 months ago

I'm an introvert, but I would hate this.

denzoren
Community Member
3 months ago

Finland seems to have it right...I really need to go here...what's the migration laws? Lol

Ivy la Sangrienta
Community Member
3 months ago

Tight.

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44f5 Dixit
Community Member
3 months ago

With such low no of population... One can ask for personal space in public places. Now imagine living in a world's 2nd most populated country, where you found yourself so close to unknown person that you smell what they had in lunch

MSD
Community Member
3 months ago

A nation of introverts! Sign me up!

Shane S
Community Member
3 months ago

I belong in Finland

Eva Bryson
Community Member
3 months ago

So you have to shout to be heard?

Ivy la Sangrienta
Community Member
3 months ago

No. We're a quiet people.

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Cheshire
Community Member
1 month ago

Yesssssas

Gamer Girl
Community Member
1 month ago

How does one make friends in Finland? Or get to know someone?

Rosemary Moreland
Community Member
2 months ago

Must be nearly Covid free yhere

Hobistapioka
Community Member
3 months ago

Also same in Sweden. We don't do small talks or sit beside a stranger on the bus

Jace
Community Member
3 months ago

No huge and densely populated cities, I take it?

Vicky Ponce
Community Member
3 months ago

Boring and cold oposite to Latinoamérica

Vicky Ponce
Community Member
3 months ago

Boring ... how nice is to be latina

Anthony Nizza
Community Member
3 months ago

That would be hard for me.

Tee Witt
Community Member
3 months ago

What happens on busy shopping days/ sports events, etc?

Eemeli Saarelainen (Molter)
Community Member
2 months ago

We tolerate it. Everyone has to give up some of that distance out of necessity. In sports events the sense of community sometimes brings people unusually close so they can, for example, hug complete strangers. Also, alcohol helps as well and my fellow Finns spend a lot of it.

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Jennifer Davis
Community Member
3 months ago

That sounds lonley but fun if ur in a mood

Diana Jonkman
Community Member
3 months ago

So how people do make friends?

Ivy la Sangrienta
Community Member
3 months ago

When I find out I'll let you know, lol.

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#8

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About USA...we are going to talk to you. We like to make small talk with strangers because it sometimes leads to friendships or even just perks of having acquaintances. Once we hear your accent, oh SNAP! We will have a million questions about your country. Some will seem ignorant, some will just be downright funny. Humor us.

AGirlNamedRoni , Priscilla Du Preez Report

Michelle M
Community Member
3 months ago

Well, this is nice. It's tiring to keep hearing about how loud and rude Americans are. Most people just believe the stereotype without ever meeting an American.

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#9

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About USA: do not pick up babies. Anywhere. I went to costco with a few Korean foreign exchange student friends and one of them picked up a baby from the cart. The mother was looking away and when she turned back I saw the instant fear in her eyes. I told my friend to put the baby down and explained to the mom that they were foreign and its okay to touch babies in Korea.

Alexandervz , Jomjakkapat Parrueng Report

Sara Rodrigues
Community Member
3 months ago

Yeah I never saw anyone pick up babies in other countries, specially those that aren't yours or related to you!

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Otherwise, you might stick out like a sore thumb and instantly identify yourself as an ignorant tourist. Unfortunately, this stereotype is often applied to people of the good ol’ US of A when taking their vacations outside of the country.

Perhaps it’s their headstrong and confident nature that can be jarring to more introverted or reserved cultures. Or their animated behaviors and loud voices, previously only seen from a distance through movies and TV. 

Either way, we’ve written a couple of articles specifically on it before, so be sure to check them out here and here once you’re done. Like we said though, it is just a stereotype so not every American is automatically lacking self-awareness and being disrespectful—we don’t want to be hypocrites here!

#10

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About southern Italy:

Be loud

If someone is doing it, you can do it too.

Whatever you need, most people would love to help you, but usually have no clue on how to communicate with you. Make sure you appreciate the effort, no matter how clumsy.

Both guys and girls say hi with a kiss on each cheek.

No such thing as personal space.

If you're driving, be extremely careful. Everything is supposed to be an advice, not actual laws. (I mean everything is supposed to be laws, is just taken as an advice).

If you happen to have some friend's mother or grandmother cook for you, make sure you compliment her thoroughly and clearly state that you never had such an amazing meal wherever you're from (there's a reasonable chance that could actually be true).

If you're clubbing, don't randomly approach girls, unless you really know what you're doing. Guys tend to be overprotective with the girls that "belong" to their group.

If you're a girl, you're gonna get hit on no matter what. Try not to be too rude and just dismiss the guy laughing about it.

We wear shoes in the house. Unless you're hanging out with a younger crowd (then it's completely fine to get your shoes off) keep your shoes on.

You can drink wherever you please

Don't wear white socks with sandals, you're gonna be laughed at. Either wear shoes or sandals with no socks.

If you show any sort of effort of speaking Italian, you're gonna be loved for it.

I'm pretty sure this covers most of the basics, if anyone is curious we could get into more detail.

escaday , Michael Lucarelli Report

achilles get down from there
Community Member
3 months ago

Also, beware the giant tour buses taking the cliff road dog-leg turns at high speeds

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#11

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Denmark: DO NOT STAND OR WALK IN THE BIKELANE! You will get yelled at and/or run over.

Tiralina , Bike Lane Report

Caro Caro
Community Member
3 months ago

Not only in Denmark!

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#12

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About I live in Sweden.

Don't get too close to me, our personal space is rather big.

If you're taking the bus, do not ever sit down next to another person if there's other free seats.

You take your goddamn shoes off when you're inside your house or someone elses.

Draculas_Dentist , Henrik Sandklef Report

Natalie
Community Member
3 months ago

I think I need to move to Sweden.

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It does raise an important point for those traveling, however. How can we learn to be respectful of other cultures? It requires some retraining of our thoughts and some self-assessment.

For example, Susan Goldberg, the editor-in-chief of National Geographic, addressed the history of the long-running magazine and faced the accusations that their reporting in the past was feeding into clichés and stereotypes of the time. A sort of tourism of other cultures, viewed from an outsider perspective without the respect given accordingly. 

So, acknowledging your own differences and seeing others with an open mind from home is a starting point. And it’s recognizing what makes us similar, not different that brings us together.

#13

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About I live in Korea. Off the top of my head:

people are going to touch / gently push / bump into you in public places, without saying anything like "excuse me" or the Korean equivalent - this is a crowded place, get used to it

small talk with clerks or whatever in public places is not expected and is downright strange

you should always be extra deferential to elders, especially if you're young (say under 30) (giving them your seat on the subway, letting them cut the line, things like that)

people will ask you your age not because they're rude, but because in Korea it's important for establishing how they should address you when they speak

lotsa complicated rules for eating and drinking which I don't have time to go into here but would if someone was interested

PDAs are frowned upon, even minor things like a long kiss

same-gender touching/hugging/holding hands is common, without there being any sort of homosexual connotation

men should avoid going shirtless in public, even when exercising or running or something like that (some guys even keep their shirts on at the beach, and not because they're overweight or something)

waynefoolx , cattan2011 Report

Premislaus de Colo
Community Member
3 months ago

and if you have a baby, someone may pick it up ;)

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#14

Australia

Don't pick up or touch insects - or any other kind of animal that you're not familiar with. You might end up not needing your ticket back.

DO try to put on an Australian accent. Seriously, it's hilarious for us.

This is Australia; you can do whatever the hell you like.

Stick to the marked walking tracks, don't drive your car places it's not designed to go, and if you DO want to see some really wild, memorable places off the beaten track- make sure you have an experienced friend with you, with all the gear you need. If you do have a capable 4wd, make sure you've at least used it off-road too before you try something too difficult. Your soccer mum Audi Q7 is not a capable car, leave that s**t parked beside the hair dresser where it belongs.

stephenhawking5 Report

Foxxy (The Original)
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

Don't swim in places that have croc, bluebottle/box jellyfish or shark warnings. But most of all, watch out for rips, they are even more deadly. Make sure you slip, slop, slap, seek and slide aka slip on a shirt, slop on sunscreen, slap on a hat, seek shade and slide on sunnies during spring and summer.

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#15

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Vietnam - commit to crossing the road. I know it looks scary due to the endless scooter stampede but if you just cross at a steady pace, they'll avoid you. Do not try to dodge or make sudden movements, you will get your ass hit and there will be no sympathy.

ricehatwarrior Report

Marette
Community Member
3 months ago

I experienced this first hand a few years ago... in the end a lovely man grabbed my arm & 'escorted' me to the other side as I just couldn't do it on my own 😅

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#16

UK. You never, ever, jump a queue

Aliktren Report

Aroace tiger (any pronouns)
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

Isn't this rude everywhere tho?

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#17

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Also lived in Japan. This is what I have to say. Bow to people who bow to you. Bow to people in general when they give you a service. It's a sign of respect and it goes a long way.

Also, take off your shoes and respect the culture

LazzzyButtons , Jezael Melgoza Report

Alex Luiz
Community Member
3 months ago

I really try to be respectful in any country I visit, but bowing is something we just never do in the UK. I would worry about getting it wrong and accidentally offending someone-is it better to try and bow or just not risk it?

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#18

Small town USA:

When we ask questions, we're looking for ways in which we're similar. We want to know how you fit in, which is more or less a question of how we fit in, where we can help each other, what it is that brings us together.

Example: "I am from Sweden."

"You're from Sweden? That's so cool, I had a cousin that went to Sweden before, he said it was really awesome. I've visited France before, is Sweden anything like France?"

"Not really."

"Oh okay, that's understandable, but at least you're both European, right?"

"I guess."

"Well I've had Swedish fish before, is Swedish fish actually Swedish?"

"Well yes."

"Cool so do you guys eat it all the time!"

"Not really, not more than you guys eat candy I suppose."

"Right, that's true, yeah, we both like candy!"

"Right."

(Note: this does not imply ignorance. It's an effusiveness of our desire to want to belong in a community. The local community knows and cares for each other and so an opportunity to bring someone else who fits in is an exciting way of expanding your proximal agency.)

Big city USA:

When we ask questions, we're looking for ways in which we're different from each other. This is so that we can distinguish ourselves amongst the giant crowd of people we're surrounded by every day. We want to know what unique, idiosyncratic new perspective you can bring on board, because for the most part we've already heard of and dealt with all the rest.

Example:

"I'm from Sweden."

"Yeah I know a few people from Sweden, which part of Sweden?"

"Stockholm."

"Yeah it seems most the people I meet from Sweden are from around there, what neighborhood do you live in?"

"Södermalm."

"Yeah I had a buddy that lived there, what did you do while you lived there?"

"I was a banker."

"Well so was he but which bank? "

(Note: this is not to imply arrogance. It's an effusiveness of our desire to extend our network and our reach into further corners of global map so that we can increase a larger and more competitive social safety net, or in short, to find community within a mass of people).

PolarisDiB Report

Witchling
Community Member
3 months ago

This is actually a great way to explain American small talk w foreigners!!

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#19

England here. If someone asks 'you alright?' Or 'alright mate?', this is not an invitation to explain how you are doing in any sort of detail. The only acceptable answers are 'yeh mate, you?' And 'not bad, yourself?' Anything else is just weird.

JackLegg Report

Edward Shaw
Community Member
3 months ago

A nasal grunt is also an acceptable reply.

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#20

Brazil

Contrary to popular belief, you shouldn't take off your clothes in public in Brazil. Yes, at least a few tourists are arrested every year for this.

Try not to bribe too many officials.

We are going to touch you. This is the tropics, it isn't f**king Scandinavia. Give us a hug. And three kisses in our cheeks. This is how I greet strangers.

SPEAK UP. I CAN'T HEAR YOU. Brazil is loud.

If a woman touch you, it doesn't mean she wants to have sex. Be respectful, dammit.

Contrary to popular belief, we're not "easy". Maybe you'll think that it's easier to kiss someone here than in Europe, but people won't have sex to you just because they kissed you. It might mean nothing.

Contrary to popular belief, Brazil is actually quite a conservative place. Don't judge what is acceptable or not to do based on what people do in carnival or what 18 year olds do in wild nights out.

Top less is not allowed in 99.99999% of public places. We are very conservative. Even walking around in bathing suits can get you in trouble if you're not by the pool or in a beach.

There are people who don't like football. They exist.

schmook Report

Kathryn Baylis
Community Member
3 months ago

Quite a bit of this is a surprise, and not a bad one either. Glad to know it’s not a wild party free for all in Brazil. Just have to get rid of Bolsinaro.

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#21

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Southerners, USA: Be really mindful if someone says "bless your heart," because that could mean you earned high favor or just stepped in a big pile of trouble.

napalmkitten , Austin Distel Report

Michelle M
Community Member
3 months ago

'Bless your innocent heart' with a gentle shake of the head and pitiful look - You're in big trouble.

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#22

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About been hearing a lot of northern Europeans talking about bike lanes, so: In America, if you rent a bike, you should be aware that even if the bike lane is painted onto the street in a rainbow pattern with flashing neon lights, nobody gives a s**t. You are not safe in the bike lane.

unknown , Jasper Garratt Report

Two_rolling_black_eyes
Community Member
3 months ago

Bike lanes are the Brussel sprouts of transportation in America. Those who know better keep giving them to us but we don't want them and just seeing them makes many of us angry. In many cities, bicyclists are truly hated because many defy all traffic laws and take up our precious street parking.

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#23

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About India

There's lots of little cultural taboos. But one thing I can remember right now is, never refer to someone older than you by their name. If you are young (below 20-ish), you can refer to middle-aged and older people as 'Aunty' and 'Uncle', or 'Sir' and 'Ma'am'. It gets slightly confusing when you are around 20 (like I am) and the person is in their late twenties or early thirties. But yeah. Never call someone older by their name.

DO NOT DRINK THE TAP WATER.

stephenhawking5 , Antonio Rubio Report

Michelle M
Community Member
3 months ago

This is a thing in Nigeria too. Sometimes, younger siblings do not refer to their older siblings by their real name. Instead of John, you say 'brother John.' And you don't refer to someone's parent as Mrs this or Mr that. We say John's mom or Moji's dad. Elderly people are Mama, Baba, Papa, Grandma, Grandpa. We don't observe this in my family but most Nigerians do. Respect is a big thing here

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#24

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About When going to a friend's house and the family offers you have dinner with them, it is impolite to say no.

Also, they would insist that you stay over in case you've had too much a lambanog and will give you the next best mattress they have.

Before you leave, accept the leftover they give should you be hungry on your way back home.

Filipino hospitality at its essence.

hanbanee , tofuprod Report

Michelle M
Community Member
3 months ago

If I had 30 Filipino friends, I would never worry about dinner again.

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#25

Portuguese here:
Speak in spanish with us and you will get punched in the throat

ColdFusionPT Report

Sara Rodrigues
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

Hahaha not punched, but we will definitely answer in portuguese, english or "portunhol" (which is just portuguese with a spanish accent and maybe some spanish words xD)

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#26

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Germany:

our waiters usually earn above minimum wage, so you never tip more than 15%, normally 10% for small amounts and a bit less for larger bills.

on the escalator, if you want to stand, stand on the right side and let others pass left.

if you rent a bike, don't drive like your own granny, drive fast and if you want to pause, get off the bike lane. Also, don't walk on our f**king bike lanes, they are clearly marked (blue signs with a white bike and mostly red paint on the bike lane). If you approach a tram or bus stop, brake and let people get on and off the train.

queue from the right at things like a burger joint so that passer-byes are not blocked. At museums, trains or the airport, queue frontally.

yes, it is common to encounter nude people of all ages in the sauna or at some lakes or even at some few parks in the city. Don't stare and for god's sake don't comment on this.

not everyone here is from Bavaria or thinks Bavaria is great. Likewise, not everyone loves beer and sausages.

and don't mention the war, k?

ABoutDeSouffle , Ansgar Scheffold Report

Marik
Community Member
3 months ago

Don't cross the street when the traffic light is red - especially with children around. Exception: when the traffic light is green at the point you already stepped on the street you may cross it. 🙃 Also, you need help to get around? Don't fear to ask. We may look as if you will be dismissed but we will try to help (I learned that the most helpfull, and knowlegdeable ones are the weird looking and homeless). ☻ Lastly, if a street-artist is catching your attention to stop for at least a minute - leave a little money. 💃

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#27

Iceland

Don't drive offroad. Because the tracks will stay for long time in the land.

stephenhawking5 Report

Kathryn Baylis
Community Member
3 months ago

Wish it was like that here in the US. I shudder to think of the habitats that are destroyed just to boost someone’s testosterone level.

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#28

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Thailand

When you meet someone you have not seen for a while , they will make a comment about your weight .. Heavier or Skinner .. they're not trying to be offensive .. it's just how they are ..

We're pretty much the least homophobic place on earth , two dude who are stright like to make gay lover jokes to each other..

You can pay the policemen to get out of minor traffic stuff.

Feet are consider very dirty .. and head is very important .. dont mix them up , ie : dont put your shoes on any shelve that taller than your head.

You dont have to tip a lot when dine out ,

If you're a tourist .. expect to pay way more than local when buying something .. a lot of business charges 3x the amount of service for tourist especially westerners. Bring a local with you to haggle!

damn_jexy , Luca Conti Report

Michelle M
Community Member
3 months ago

I only saw 'You can pay the police to get out of minor traffic stuff.' Is that a nice way to write 'bribery' or is that a rule over there?

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#29

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About Mexico. When eating in a taquería, you'll find that the tacos are small but cheap (and also that they don't resemble anything you gringos would name a taco). You don't immediately order all the tacos you plan to eat. You order the tacos you'll eat in ten minutes. That way you get them right out of the fire. You need to put lime and onion, and several sauces on them to make them live to their full potential. Then you order again. Don't worry about counting; your waiter will keep track. When you pay and leave, just leave the tip on the table. Tipping is completely up to you, depends on the quality of the service and the usual amount is 10% because we don't let our servers starve.

Also, and this is very important: three things are sacred here: the Flag, the Virgin and the Football Selection. Even if you are talking with a malinchista, atheist, obese man who doesn't care about the three, you are not allowed to insult them. EVER. We can, we're Mexican and we can s**t on anything Mexican if we want. If you do it, you're on your own. What Miley Cyrus did to our flag, done anywhere else by anyone else is enough to get you brutally murdered and the records missing. Do not touch our three sacred things. EXCEPTION: if your Selection is playing against ours you can s**t on it up to six hours after the match started, and only of you win. The exception does not apply if you're talking to an angry drunk man.

dontknowmeatall , Jezael Melgoza Report

Emme Magnolia
Community Member
3 months ago

Well that escalated quickly

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#30

30 People Are Sharing 'Unwritten' Rules In Their Countries That Foreigners Might Not Know About I live in Singapore. Where I'm at, such as fast food restaurants and food courts, there's a common practice known as "chopeing", where one can "chope", or reserve a table by placing a packet of tissues on the table. Tourists who have no idea of this usually take the table obliviously and gets dirty looks from the local who "choped" the table.

RadioactiveNewt Report

Sara Rodrigues
Community Member
3 months ago

A packet of tissues, really??

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