Americans have long been exporting their pop culture to the world. With TV shows and movies being among the most consumed global American exports, it's no surprise that US actors and directors are recognized all around the globe. However, for all of us non-Americans out there, sometimes the silver screens get us all dazed and confused. Do American people really drink from those red plastic cups at parties? Do they really wear shoes inside their houses? Is homecoming really such a big thing as movies make it out to be?

But we're gonna need a true expert's opinion on the matter—our Bored Panda readers living in the US! So scroll down below to read all the questions that people had about the things they saw on TV and feel free to share your answers!

#1

221Lauren Report

Felix Feline
Community Member
7 months ago

Living in a college town I can attest that yes they do. It's all anyone talks about, and the traffic jams are awful. High school football here is just as bad.

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#2

euricawithhope Report

Andres Tejeda
Community Member
7 months ago

Its the easiest reference for us and a football field is 100yards or 300 feet or 91.44 meters.

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#3

PaigeImogenxx Report

Kristin Scarbrough
Community Member
7 months ago

We say goodbye, or something like it. It's an idiosyncrasy of script writing, not Americans.

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#4

angelvnte Report

Ayasophya Alturas
Community Member
7 months ago

the only thing in my locker is a mound of trash.

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#5

cereaImiIk Report

Why?
Community Member
7 months ago

We also wear our shoes in bed as well.

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#6

kaya_lorne Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

When my relatives from Ireland come to visit, they love to play with the garbage disposal. Even the people in their 60's think it is hilarious. They refer to it as "the murder sink".

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#7

XXXX_G0LD Report

Laura Land
Community Member
7 months ago

I'm American and it's a select few who do that but it's not the norm.

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#8

sIeepfordays Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, we do. It is the only access we have to water.

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#9

disposablefilms Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

When I was in school, it was hard boiled eggs. Now they have high-tech baby dolls called Baby Think About it. It is a Life Skills class that teaches you how to be an adult.

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#10

mynameisnotmac Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Millions of people eat this daily in the US.

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#11

gracieelaciee Report

ROSSELAIRA EUGENIE CRUZ
Community Member
7 months ago

In my family, we only use paper plates for gatherings.

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#12

benallenwf Report

Kristy P
Community Member
7 months ago

The "funeral" is usually in a church and then a burial service graveside.

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#13

mrsmop68 Report

Colin L
Community Member
7 months ago

We're tough! We don't need... er... pill lubricants?

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#14

RiverrunStately Report

Catlady6000
Community Member
7 months ago

This is especially true in small towns. The largest parking lot in town is the local teen hangout

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#15

sam_pIant Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, Homecoming is really big here in the US. Celebrating at high school and university.

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#16

Uhuras Report

MammaG
Community Member
7 months ago

Why? Hot water is hot water.

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#17

taanapoop Report

Colin L
Community Member
7 months ago

You don't?!?!!

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#18

KatieBelsey Report

Keith Nolen
Community Member
7 months ago

Because Americans have been sold the lie (mostly by Nestle, thank you!) that bottled water is better than tap water in some way. In truth most of the bottled water IS tap water.

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#19

sIeepfordays Report

Ayasophya Alturas
Community Member
7 months ago

my sister has about 400. I have 2.

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#20

a_girl_probably Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

I believe this is mostly a southern trait.

CaptainDinosaur
Community Member
7 months ago

I can confirm this. I call him 'sir' and he calls me 'boy'. I am 36.

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Well, I Tried
Community Member
7 months ago

So somewhere in the southern part of America, some three year old kid is asking 'sir can I have a cookie?' To his dad?

April Simnel
Community Member
7 months ago

I was raised by my mom's family who originated in Alabama, and I had to call my guardian (who was also my aunt) "ma'am". The idea was that adults were to be called "sir" or "ma'am" by their juniors as a sign of respect for their age and authority.

Helen Haley
Community Member
7 months ago

It depends on how strict or southern the family is. Just said dad in our house. Unless he was being an ahole, then we said father.

Meyer Weinstock
Community Member
7 months ago

besides a regionally Southern thing, it also stems from military service, which is often multi-generational in some families

deanna woods
Community Member
7 months ago

I have never called my father "sir".

Ivana
Community Member
7 months ago

Freaked me out when my friends called their fathers sir. Made me think their fathers didn't love them. When I was a kid, that is literally why I thought they didn't

ROSSELAIRA EUGENIE CRUZ
Community Member
7 months ago

I was forced to call my dad 'sir.' Southern stuff, I guess.

John Montgomery
Community Member
7 months ago

I don't call anyone sir. I don't like people calling me sir. I'm in the minority of that view though.

Siena Valenta
Community Member
7 months ago

Nope. Saw a movie with that in it, tried calling my dad sir, got in trouble.

Robin DJW
Community Member
7 months ago

It's a term of respect. Why not use it? We used to say "Yes, sir, Daddy" when asked to do something (or stop doing something). We were not southerners. And I would be saying it still if he were among the living.

Amy Walker
Community Member
7 months ago

I'm from the South and we were taught to address men as "Sir" and women as "Ma'am". I still do it and I am 57 yrs old. I call men younger than me who are in a position of authority "sir".

Well, I Tried
Community Member
7 months ago

The post is asking if people call their own fathers sir. I think most respectful people call people older or people in authority "sir" or "ma'am"

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Rick
Community Member
7 months ago

When I visited the south from England and was tried to be forced into saying “mam” or “ma’am” I got out of it by saying in England we can only call the Queen “Ma’am” ;)

C
Community Member
7 months ago

It's not weird, it's respectful. I grew up saying sir and ma'am to anyone who was an adult

Up All Night
Community Member
7 months ago

It's respectful toward strangers, but for family members... cold. Like imagine the child saying daddy and getting the response "I'm not your dad, I'm sir to you"

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AQUINNAH POLOZOLA
Community Member
7 months ago

If they say "yes sir" or "yes 'ma'am" then it's just being polite. (Or maybe it's just a southern thing. Idk)

Steve Barker
Community Member
7 months ago

It iS mostly a Southern thing. But, we don't mean any respect by it.

Nia Loves Art
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

It depends on the family. I call my dad “Dad.” I call older men who are not related to me sir.

Evil Little Thing
Community Member
7 months ago

In the South, kids are taught to call all adults sir or ma'am to avoid getting in trouble. So they are most likely to call their parent sir or ma'am when said parent is annoyed with them.

CORRINE STANLEY
Community Member
7 months ago

it depends on the family. like i just call him dad

I_Love_Food🍰🍨🍱🍤🐕🐈
Community Member
7 months ago

this is like, 1900s boys in the south

Jana Boardman
Community Member
7 months ago

It's a mark of respect. Mostly we just call him "Dad", but when orders are given, it's "Yes, Sir". Or Ma'am, if it's Mom.

Steve Cruz
Community Member
7 months ago

Some people call their father "GOOD GOD" or "JESUSFUKKINGCHRIST" as they storm out of the room.

Kelli
Community Member
7 months ago

I most definitely do! Sign of respect.

Brent Kaufman
Community Member
7 months ago

I grew up with friends that had to do that (in the 60s and 70s).

Beth Arriaga
Community Member
7 months ago

Grow up Southern AND with a military father! You say ma'am and sir as a matter of course. However, having lived in California the last 20 years, I know many many people who say sir and ma'am. It's just polite. My kids all say to me and they are grown adults - teaching their children to do the same. Manners matter

Mishte Tine
Community Member
7 months ago

I had to call my male school teachers Sir at all times, not just as a polite way to end a sentence/question. My father was Pa until I switched to Dad when I realized no one else said Pa.

Cindy Snow
Community Member
7 months ago

Only nerds lol

Emily Smith
Community Member
7 months ago

Not here in the Northwest (Oregon) we don't! I agree....weird!

Tanyard Park
Community Member
7 months ago

It's usually a term of respect used when one is in trouble: "Do you understand me?!"... "yes sir". Otherwise Dad, Pop, Papa...

Ringo Starkey
Community Member
7 months ago

It is something that is going away.

Drive Bee
Community Member
7 months ago

Most call their fathers "dad"

vogonpoet
Community Member
7 months ago

I call my partner "Sir", but that's something *completely* different

Felix Utterback
Community Member
7 months ago

Happens sometimes. Depends on how much trouble you're about to be in

Randy Roberts
Community Member
7 months ago

Thats an old dying tradition. Maybe only still used in the southern states if anywhere.

Aimee Simmons
Community Member
7 months ago

We are raised with it as a term of respect for each other. and it's not just a term used for those over us. It should be used between peers as well if it's being used correctly. Sir and Ma-am.

Raymond Ewen
Community Member
7 months ago

It is polite to call anyone about your parents age or older Sir or Mam.

Joyce Berman
Community Member
7 months ago

It's respectful, not weird. Every country has customs that other people might consider strange.

Autumn Walton
Community Member
7 months ago

It's not southern and it's not weird. It's respectful and you don't have to call your parent that all the time. Normally it's if they ask you to do something or if they're in a bad mood.

AliJanx
Community Member
7 months ago

Southern. And it's used when showing respect.

CbusResident
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

I think that almost never happens anymore, maybe in some really conservative households, and more in the past. Just like wooden shoes in Holland - yes, that was a real practice, but really only a long time ago, and would be considered eccentric now.

Johnny Farnen
Community Member
7 months ago

Only when one is in trouble and about to face a whoopin', son.

Debbie Faircloth
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

I have never witnessed anyone referring to their father in that manner. We were brought up to reply "Yes/no, sir or ma'am" to adults. It's a sign of respect. I still find myself saying it to my elders although I am close to being one of them. lol

Lance d'Boyle
Community Member
7 months ago

If you grew up with a hard ass father, maybe.

Hiie Posti
Community Member
7 months ago

I call my father dad. But again I'm not a American...

Anna Martin
Community Member
7 months ago

Yep...it's Southern

Mary Kelly
Community Member
7 months ago

only in some places in the south...and usually its just when they are in trouble...in the south, you call all adults sir or mam...as in, yes sir, yes mam...not to is considered impolite...in the south, they call closer adults miss so-and-so...and mister so-and-so...when i first moved to the south, i had to get used to kids calling me miss mary...

albertmarksjr@aol.com
Community Member
7 months ago

I've called my bosses, policemen and judges SIR, but never my father who was Dad or Daddy.

Tiffany Marie
Community Member
7 months ago

I think it depends. I always called mine Daddy even in my late 20's. He's passed though.

Lisa Shelton
Community Member
7 months ago

Depends on the region and the father

Karon Sheffield
Community Member
7 months ago

I'm from Texas. Using Sir and Ma'am when addressing your elders or superior is a form of respect given to honor their status. Kids especially use the terms when they are in trouble. When I moved to Ohio and used Sir and Ma'am I was looked at like I had three heads, a forked tongue, and just called my boss a dirty word. Northerners don't usually say it.

Toast Of Saint Louis
Community Member
7 months ago

In the midwest we do, don't know any place else.

Bumblebee
Community Member
7 months ago

In the Netherlands we have kind of a similar thing. Though in most families we just say mom or dad (though using the Dutch word mama / papa). In being respectful to people older than you, we use you ("jou" in Dutch). For people our age or younger. And U (same word, different pronunciation and no caps in Dutch) for people who are older than you or someone with authority. There are a few families who do say "u" to their parents, because their parents want to feel more respected. Though personally I have only known one family where this was the case. I don't know how common this really is / what the statistics are.

Amanda Rudnicki
Community Member
7 months ago

It's territorial and depends on the family. Down south, if you come from a formal family, yes... But not always.

Andrea Anthony
Community Member
7 months ago

no, I call my father Dad

Dre Mosley
Community Member
7 months ago

A southern thing that extends beyond just your parents. As a kids I was taught to use "sir" and "ma'am" when addressing any adult.

DKS 001
Community Member
7 months ago

as an american: shit no. "Hey dad!" was our family. Some it is "father", others it is "pa/papa". I've never heard anyone say "sir" to their father unless they were raised super rich. Which most of us are not.

Karen Johnston
Community Member
7 months ago

I called mine "Daddio"

kitty_player 03
Community Member
7 months ago

it's a southern thing

CrunChewy McSandybutt
Community Member
7 months ago

It's pretty common in military families, but not too much outside of that.

Shart
Community Member
7 months ago

Not really...

Sasha Ross
Community Member
7 months ago

Nope, no way.

Ericka s
Community Member
7 months ago

Everyone on the planet is usually either a 'sir' or 'ma'am'. If you're friendly or I'm fond of you and you're not an older relative, it's 'honey' or 'darlin''. If I've had a bad day or I'm exhausted, it's 'Yes'um.'. If you're a jerk, it's "sweetie". Glad to help translate "Southern'" for ya'll.

Allen Dela Cruz
Community Member
7 months ago

It's for every son who has a parent that was in the military

Becca Gizmo the Squirrel
Community Member
7 months ago

I don't know anyone that calls their dad sir.

Olive
Community Member
7 months ago

So now I know that many don't do this as a casual response with people. Whoops? Is it weird to others to do so?

elfin
Community Member
7 months ago

No one I know does, but I'm sure there are exceptions.

Pavlina G
Community Member
7 months ago

Only in the south

C
Community Member
7 months ago

I grew up in the north and my parents are both from the North. I was always taught this way

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Tabitha L
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes. Being from Louisiana, it was 'yes sir/yes ma'am'. Could not say "what"? to my parents. If I didn't hear, I said 'sir?' It was a sign of respect.

🛸 🌠⭐Lucita 🌌🌙 👽
Community Member
7 months ago

idk they try to get us to say "yes sir" and all that

Sandra Simpson
Community Member
7 months ago

I only called my dad sir when I was in trouble

Jaguarundi
Community Member
7 months ago

I have referred to every lady as "Ma'am"and every mature gentleman as "Sir' my entire life. I was a US military child with Mid-Western parents.

Lisa Chambers
Community Member
7 months ago

We are respectful. We even call the pets Sir or Maam (as in ham). We arent interested in what you think of it.

hopie
Community Member
7 months ago

It’s POLITE you never heard of R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Random Panda
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

For strangers it's the respectful thing to do. It seems very cold and impersonal to call your own parents "sir"/"ma'am". You can be plenty respectful to your family without indulging some weird power trip.

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Donna Leske
Community Member
7 months ago

I believe that is a British thing. Some of call very elderly men sir, that's about it

Sue Knerl
Community Member
7 months ago

Or if you've been raised to be polite. Ma'am is also standard. I get called that all the time.

The Emerald Triangle
Community Member
7 months ago

Maybe 50 years ago! Now we're lucky if they address "dad" at all.

M Adams
Community Member
7 months ago

Again, cultures within a culture. In the South it is respectful to call adults of any age sir or ma'am. It is considered polite. It has little to do with age, as I actually say sir or ma'am to students to model the behavior.

D'Everette Henderson
Community Member
7 months ago

that's not weird thats etiquette, fucking dumbass, its yes sir no sir yes ma'am no ma'am

Lady Laura
Community Member
7 months ago

Why would respecting your elders be weird?

Full Name
Community Member
7 months ago

Because the border crossing officer is sir. Your high school principal is sir. Your family is dad. Sir has zero warmth and could be anybody.

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SBW71
Community Member
7 months ago

It's called raised with manners. Men older than you are called sir and women are called ma'm

Up All Night
Community Member
7 months ago

It' called manners only when it comes to strangers. If you can't call your parents mom and dad, it's like you have no family or they dislike you. I mean how these kind of parents call EACH OTHER?

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C
Community Member
7 months ago

This comment is hidden. Click here to view.

What is weird about respect? I always did it out of respect for any adult... sir/ma'am.

Up All Night
Community Member
7 months ago

It's weird when when they force a small child to do that. Forced "respect" is not respect anyway, and what these men are missing in their life if they feel the need to do this? Does no one call them sir outside home?

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Daniel Lewis
Community Member
7 months ago

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Do people in your country actually call their fathers "Lover"?

Up All Night
Community Member
7 months ago

"Sir" sounds like he's not even the real father and you're just a bastard or unloved stepchild.

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#21

NeedsDirection Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, we do. Or Fritos or Cheetos.

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#22

todorokidokie Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

We do call them Kleenex all the time probably because that brand is what we used.

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#23

libbybrwnlw Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

I had a lab partner in chemistry and biology in high school.

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#24

ThandekaMsane Report

Dynein
Community Member
7 months ago

I think that is to avoid accidental advertising? I'd think that in most (industrialized) countries, the typical bags offered by stores have the store logo all over them...

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#25

tobesostyles Report

ROSSELAIRA EUGENIE CRUZ
Community Member
7 months ago

I guess it depends. My family and friends only do photoshoots for weddings, 18th birthdays (girls), 21st birthdays (boys), or someone's first birthday.

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#26

danaokeke Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

Chicken and waffles is a religious experience. I live in the Midwest and some of the best chicken and waffles in the world is right here in Indianapolis at Maxine's Chicken and Waffles. Another awesome place is in Harlem (where chicken and waffles was invented).

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#27

foreverqal Report

Daniel Lewis
Community Member
7 months ago

Because hot chocolate is the candy bar that melted in your pocket.

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#28

Fkatiee Report

April Simnel
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

It's ground meat with binders like egg and breadcrumbs, and can also have minced onions and peppers (capsicum), and seasonings that's all mixed together and baked in a loaf pan in the oven. Most people make it with just ground beef, but when I was little in the 70s, in our home it was made with ground beef, pork, and veal, and we had it maybe once a month with homemade mashed potatoes and brown gravy, and a green vegetable. I don't eat meatloaf now. It's not horrible, it's just not my first choice for comfort food.

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#29

rrudegal Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, many people do.

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#30

aIIexx_ Report

April Simnel
Community Member
7 months ago

In the big cities, all you need to do is raise your arm on a busy street. I've lived in NYC almost 30 years now, and no one yells "TAXI!" here. I grew up in a smaller town, though, and in the smaller places, you pretty much have to call a taxi in advance. I never flagged a cab until I moved to NYC.

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