Americans have long been exporting their pop culture to the world. With TV shows and movies being among the most consumed global American exports, it's no surprise that US actors and directors are recognized all around the globe. However, for all of us non-Americans out there, sometimes the silver screens get us all dazed and confused. Do American people really drink from those red plastic cups at parties? Do they really wear shoes inside their houses? Is homecoming really such a big thing as movies make it out to be?

But we're gonna need a true expert's opinion on the matter—our Bored Panda readers living in the US! So scroll down below to read all the questions that people had about the things they saw on TV and feel free to share your answers!

#1

221Lauren Report

Felix Feline
Community Member
7 months ago

Living in a college town I can attest that yes they do. It's all anyone talks about, and the traffic jams are awful. High school football here is just as bad.

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#2

euricawithhope Report

Andres Tejeda
Community Member
7 months ago

Its the easiest reference for us and a football field is 100yards or 300 feet or 91.44 meters.

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#3

PaigeImogenxx Report

Kristin Scarbrough
Community Member
7 months ago

We say goodbye, or something like it. It's an idiosyncrasy of script writing, not Americans.

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#4

angelvnte Report

Ayasophya Alturas
Community Member
7 months ago

the only thing in my locker is a mound of trash.

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#5

cereaImiIk Report

Why?
Community Member
7 months ago

We also wear our shoes in bed as well.

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#6

kaya_lorne Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

When my relatives from Ireland come to visit, they love to play with the garbage disposal. Even the people in their 60's think it is hilarious. They refer to it as "the murder sink".

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#7

XXXX_G0LD Report

Laura Land
Community Member
7 months ago

I'm American and it's a select few who do that but it's not the norm.

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#8

sIeepfordays Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, we do. It is the only access we have to water.

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#9

disposablefilms Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

When I was in school, it was hard boiled eggs. Now they have high-tech baby dolls called Baby Think About it. It is a Life Skills class that teaches you how to be an adult.

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#10

mynameisnotmac Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Millions of people eat this daily in the US.

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#11

gracieelaciee Report

ROSSELAIRA EUGENIE CRUZ
Community Member
7 months ago

In my family, we only use paper plates for gatherings.

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#12

benallenwf Report

Kristy P
Community Member
7 months ago

The "funeral" is usually in a church and then a burial service graveside.

ladyconstellation
Community Member
7 months ago

at my funeral i want someone to throw the boquet off my casket and who ever catches it is next

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Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

We usually have a funeral at the mortuary or a church then we go to the cemetery where the chairs are set up for a few last words by a minister or priest. Only the close family sit and the rest stand.

Spikey Bunny
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes

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deanna woods
Community Member
7 months ago

Where I live, funerals are usually held in a funeral home and then it is moved to the cemetery for the final part of the service.

M Adams
Community Member
7 months ago

Some people have a graveside service in addition to the traditional church or chapel funeral. Some Americans are cremated, and have no grave.

Amy Walker
Community Member
7 months ago

It's referred to as a "grave side service". Not everyone does it and it's mostly the older generation. The newer generations are phasing it out.

Catlady6000
Community Member
7 months ago

A lot of different factors in this. Financially, it may be a lot cheaper to have just a graveside service. Some people and their families are not religious. The wishes of the deceased and/or their families. Local customs......

Mer
Community Member
7 months ago

It can happen but mainly it would depend on the deceased's "final wishes" when possible or family necessity at the time. Normally (whatever "normal" is at any rate) there'll be a funeral service either at the fneral home or preferred church and then a smaller ceremony at the grave site (a "graveside service") for immediate family/those who want to witness it while the rest of the family/mourners leave to go to wherever the ...reception?... (people gathering for food and to comfort the grieving/gossip with others, etc) is taking place.

Lolabean
Community Member
7 months ago

We call that a wake (UK), the gathering after the funeral. I've been to cremations & Catholic funerals. With the cremation it's all at the crematorium, and at the end the coffin disappears on a conveyor belt behind the curtains and you then would go straight to the wake. The catholic funerals had mass at the church, then we would go to the graveside and the priest would be there too and that's when the whole "ashes to ashes, dust to dust" bit happens. The coffin is lowered into the ground with everyone there, and people take it in turns to throw earth onto the coffin. Normally it will be the spouse of the deceased first, followed by closest family such as their children etc followed by anyone else. Generally anyone at the funeral at the church is welcome to the burial... then it's the wake.

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Ayasophya Alturas
Community Member
7 months ago

usually it starts at a church and then everyone piles in the vans, drives to the cemetery, and give speeches about the person and bury them.

Becca Gizmo the Squirrel
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

Yes..how do you do it? First is the church or funeral home. Then graveside.

Lee Kerr
Community Member
7 months ago

The funerals I’ve been to it’s church, or sometimes the cemetery chapel, then graveside, then a funeral tea, which is generally a buffet and often in a pub or club but occasionally the home. Cremations are common in the U.K. and those I’ve been to have had the service in the cemetery chapel attached to the crematorium, then the flowers are displayed, then the unreal tea. The cemetery chapels are often multi denominational so I’ve been to Salvation Army and CoE in the same building.

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Lady Laura
Community Member
7 months ago

True for services not held in a religious place

Jaymi Leigh
Community Member
7 months ago

Not necessarily. Many funerals are held in a community hall, followed by a burial for those who are invited to attend.

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GeneralZod
Community Member
7 months ago

Is this really just an American thing?? I had no idea

Bev Brown
Community Member
7 months ago

How do European’s do it? I thought that was normal.

Lee Kerr
Community Member
7 months ago

In the U.K. its a service at the church (or whatever) then a few brief words at the graveside, then a funeral tea

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DKS 001
Community Member
7 months ago

as an american: does it matter? At least people come to pay their respect

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

We have the burial service there.

Marnie
Community Member
7 months ago

My question is...as compared to what?

Verena
Community Member
7 months ago

Do men in the US really always wear suits to funerals?

Brent Kaufman
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, that is very often the case.

Jeannie Carle
Community Member
7 months ago

Not the funeral - just the graveside svc.

Emily Smith
Community Member
7 months ago

The chairs are usually set up by the church or the funeral home specifically for the service. They are usually reserved for immediate family (in case of fainting or exhaustion) or those with medical issues/elderly who can't stand.

Carrie Roettger
Community Member
7 months ago

We do both. My dad and grandmother were graveside funerals (Daddy was retired military and got a 21 gun salute). My oldest brother's was a church funeral followed by a small graveside service, My nephew's was in a chapel at the funeral home and my mother in law's was in church.

Tanyard Park
Community Member
7 months ago

Depends upon the religion, culture, ethnicity... Irish Catholic services are usually 1 - 2 days of visitation at a funeral home: people give condolences & support to the bereaved, procession to the church for a funeral service, procession to the grave site for the burial (short prayer)

Tina Scogin
Community Member
7 months ago

After the funeral service, in a funeral home or church, the family and close friends go to the graveside and there are always chairs for the family to sit in while words are said. It's pretty brief, in my experience.

Donna Gettings Apperson
Community Member
7 months ago

I've been to these.

Jewels Vern
Community Member
7 months ago

Anything goes. Except they will not lower the coffin into the grave while mourners are present. If the rope slips they don't want witnesses.

Toni Carroll
Community Member
7 months ago

Chairs at graveside are usually reserved for next of kin (parents, spouse...) It's a sign of respect.

Randy Roberts
Community Member
7 months ago

Thats an old school Southern style of service. Honestly we have a funeral at the church and then meet at the gravesite for a burial service after. I've never seen chairs. We usually all stand at the burial site.

Aimee Simmons
Community Member
7 months ago

we have the service in the church, or funeral home if you don't have a church. I never experienced one of the graveside funerals before. I am sure it's done in some parts, and not in others. It's different for each family.

Annasue Marczynski
Community Member
7 months ago

I want an open casket and once everyone is seated, the music for Pop Goes the Weasel plays. Otherwise complete silence, for 10 minutes. Then dancing. No graveside, cremation only.

Raymond Ewen
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes for Military funerals as they are long and seats for immediate family only.

Mari Bryant
Community Member
7 months ago

The funeral happens at the church and graveside. That's why the line of cars leaving the church heading to the graveyard is called a funeral procession.

Id row
Community Member
7 months ago

I've never been to one that had chairs set up beside the grave.

AliJanx
Community Member
7 months ago

In my family, we've gone strictly to memorial services, with cremation. Funeral services can be 5 times the price of cremation where I live.

Johnny Farnen
Community Member
7 months ago

Depends on where, when, and what religion one caters to. This is more common with military honors burials, given the need for gunfire. Folks get nervous when the rifle salute is done indoors.

Debbie Faircloth
Community Member
7 months ago

No. The chairs are metal.

Sarah Levine
Community Member
7 months ago

Most funerals I've been to begin with a service somewhere, and then move to the cemetery. The graveside part is much smaller. My grandmother wanted just a graveside funeral, so that was a large crowd.

Pug Pug
Community Member
7 months ago

depends, but its not uncommon. Most people stand, while the old or the family sits

Mary Kelly
Community Member
7 months ago

i guess posh people with hundreds of guests do...but it is not typical...usually only close family and friends go to the gravesite

Amanda Rudnicki
Community Member
7 months ago

Is that not universal? Yes, the wooden chairs are required to get the life insurance check.

Dre Mosley
Community Member
7 months ago

Funerals are typically held in a church, and then you leave the church and head to the grave site for the burial.

Victoria Swift
Community Member
7 months ago

They will usually set up about six to ten chairs mainly for the immediate family. Everyone else stands.

Ivana
Community Member
7 months ago

All the funerals I have been to have the chairs for elderly or immediate family while the rest of the guest stand.

kitty_player 03
Community Member
7 months ago

I think it depends

Nomadus Aureus
Community Member
7 months ago

My question is do they genuinely *sit* on graves?? Sometimes I see these photos of graves with mini flags (again, not something done in Europe) and people literally sitting or kneeling on the grave. Can someone please explain this to me? Like, graves in my country aren't flat and under no circumstances will you be sitting or standing on one.

Shart
Community Member
7 months ago

Its more of a visual aid...the service takes place at the church..people gather around the coffin just like in the movies...but even that is quick...no chairs needed

albertmarksjr@aol.com
Community Member
7 months ago

Have never seen that, so I'm guessing movie trope.

Geth
Community Member
7 months ago

No, that's a movie thing. I've never been to a graveside service. They just do it in movies for dramatic effect.

Daniel Lewis
Community Member
7 months ago

Unlike people in your country, we don't just leave dead bodies laying wherever they happen to fall.

Random Panda
Community Member
7 months ago

Must be painful to walk around with that stick so far up your ass.

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elfin
Community Member
7 months ago

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Don't know. I've never gone to a funeral and never will. Dead is dead and trying to decorate it doesn't help much.

Becca Gizmo the Squirrel
Community Member
7 months ago

Jim, not true.

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Jim Ellington
Community Member
7 months ago

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It's just a movie thing, for the most part.

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#13

mrsmop68 Report

Colin L
Community Member
7 months ago

We're tough! We don't need... er... pill lubricants?

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#14

RiverrunStately Report

Catlady6000
Community Member
7 months ago

This is especially true in small towns. The largest parking lot in town is the local teen hangout

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#15

sam_pIant Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, Homecoming is really big here in the US. Celebrating at high school and university.

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#16

Uhuras Report

MammaG
Community Member
7 months ago

Why? Hot water is hot water.

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#17

taanapoop Report

Colin L
Community Member
7 months ago

You don't?!?!!

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#18

KatieBelsey Report

Keith Nolen
Community Member
7 months ago

Because Americans have been sold the lie (mostly by Nestle, thank you!) that bottled water is better than tap water in some way. In truth most of the bottled water IS tap water.

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#19

sIeepfordays Report

Ayasophya Alturas
Community Member
7 months ago

my sister has about 400. I have 2.

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#20

a_girl_probably Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

I believe this is mostly a southern trait.

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#21

NeedsDirection Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, we do. Or Fritos or Cheetos.

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#22

todorokidokie Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

We do call them Kleenex all the time probably because that brand is what we used.

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#23

libbybrwnlw Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

I had a lab partner in chemistry and biology in high school.

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#24

ThandekaMsane Report

Dynein
Community Member
7 months ago

I think that is to avoid accidental advertising? I'd think that in most (industrialized) countries, the typical bags offered by stores have the store logo all over them...

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#25

tobesostyles Report

ROSSELAIRA EUGENIE CRUZ
Community Member
7 months ago

I guess it depends. My family and friends only do photoshoots for weddings, 18th birthdays (girls), 21st birthdays (boys), or someone's first birthday.

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#26

danaokeke Report

Erin
Community Member
7 months ago

Chicken and waffles is a religious experience. I live in the Midwest and some of the best chicken and waffles in the world is right here in Indianapolis at Maxine's Chicken and Waffles. Another awesome place is in Harlem (where chicken and waffles was invented).

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#27

foreverqal Report

Daniel Lewis
Community Member
7 months ago

Because hot chocolate is the candy bar that melted in your pocket.

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#28

Fkatiee Report

April Simnel
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

It's ground meat with binders like egg and breadcrumbs, and can also have minced onions and peppers (capsicum), and seasonings that's all mixed together and baked in a loaf pan in the oven. Most people make it with just ground beef, but when I was little in the 70s, in our home it was made with ground beef, pork, and veal, and we had it maybe once a month with homemade mashed potatoes and brown gravy, and a green vegetable. I don't eat meatloaf now. It's not horrible, it's just not my first choice for comfort food.

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#29

rrudegal Report

Hedy Hahn
Community Member
7 months ago

Yes, many people do.

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#30

aIIexx_ Report

April Simnel
Community Member
7 months ago

In the big cities, all you need to do is raise your arm on a busy street. I've lived in NYC almost 30 years now, and no one yells "TAXI!" here. I grew up in a smaller town, though, and in the smaller places, you pretty much have to call a taxi in advance. I never flagged a cab until I moved to NYC.

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