Australians are finding innovative ways to help the animals affected by the bushfires that continue to ravage the country. The government of New South Wales is using planes to drop thousands of kilograms of carrots and sweet potatoes to feed starving animals.

This stunning and creative idea is nicknamed ‘Operation Rock Wallaby’ and it’s led by the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service. The main goal of the operation is to feed the state’s marsupials since the bushfires greatly affected them.

So far, aircraft have dropped over 2,200 kilograms of fresh vegetables from the sky. Cloudy with a chance of carrots? Definitely. Scroll down for Bored Panda’s interview with an Australian from Kangaroo Island about the current situation there.

Australians are dropping thousands of kilograms of fresh veggies from the sky to feed starving animals affected by the bushfires

Image credits: AnimalsAustralia

Image credits: AnimalsAustralia

Image credits: Matt_KeanMP

Image credits: Matt_KeanMP

According to Matt Kean, the New South Wales Environment Minister, the animals who fled the fires now don’t have anything left to eat which is why they need a helping hand. One species greatly affected are the wallabies.

Wallabies fled the fires and are now starving

Image credits: AnimalsAustralia

Image credits: Matt_KeanMP

Image credits: AnimalsAustralia

Bored Panda spoke to local Steve, a cousin to two teenagers who drove around Kangaroo Island in a car saving koalas, about the current situation in Australia. Steve remains cautiously optimistic that the wildlife will recover, in time.

“The koala situation is certainly dire, but I remain cautiously optimistic. The fires destroyed a lot of their habitat, but since their primary food source is one that germinates through fire I think we’ll see nature bounce back rather quickly. That’s my hope anyway. The aim is to keep the existing population fed and cared for in the meantime,” he said about the Australian koala population.

Image credits: AnimalsAustralia

Image credits: AnimalsAustralia

Image credits: AnimalsAustralia