Photographers against wildlife crime - it’s the name of a recent project by an international group of award-winning photographers who decided to unite and use their powerful pictures to help bring an end to the illegal wildlife trade.


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Wildlife crime is one of the world’s top criminal activities, ranked alongside drugs, arms, and human trafficking. These photographers aim to spread this important message in order to inform as many people as possible since some still aren’t aware of how big of a problem this actually is. “Most of the world doesn’t’ even know what’s going on with its own planet. It’s still solvable,” claims Brent Stirton, one of the photographers taking part in this project.

Initiators have three main goals during this project. First, the photos will be put together into one book and released in May 2018. Second, it will also be released in Mandarin for a distribution in China which could make a valuable contribution towards a constructive dialogue with consumers. And finally, with those books they hope to raise funds for charities whose mission is to end the illegal wildlife trade in our lifetimes.

More info: kickstarter.com | photographersagainstwildlifecrime.com

#1

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

A member of an all female anti-poaching unit, set up in Zimbabwe. Every day, these women face the harsh reality of conservation at the front line, whilst being mothers.

Adrian Steirn Report

Caitlyn McCracken 1 month ago

Damn. This is a strong woman if I have ever seen one. Raising a baby and protecting the front lines!

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#2

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

A volunteer with the NGO, Care for Wild Africa, comforts a baby rhino after undergoing treatment for injuries caused by hyenas. The rhino was orphaned after its mother was killed by poachers. She was luckier than most as many calves who see their mothers killed are also attacked by the poachers, using machetes to break their spines so they cannot run away.

Brent Stirton Report

Hope Floats 1 month ago

My heart breaks when I read about how we treat our wildlife.....I pray that someday all this cruelty to animals will stop..

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#3

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

A gorilla in the hands of her carer as they drive to a new and larger sanctuary run for the care of orphaned or captive apes rescued by Ape Action Africa in Cameroon.

Jo-Anne McArthur Report

Caitlyn McCracken 1 month ago

That gorilla looks soooo happy

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#4

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

On April 30, 2016, Kenya staged its biggest ever ivory burn. Rangers burnt 105 tons at Nairobi National Park to stop poachers from selling it.

Charlie Hamilton James Report

Caitlyn McCracken 1 month ago

This is amazing. Sad, but amazing. It looks wasteful, but Tusks should NOT taken from animals

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#5

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

African Elephant Loxodonta, photographed at Abu Camp in Botswana. The mahout who has raised the orphan from SA has a trusted bond. The Elephants are raised to maturity and released as part of a long term study of rehabilitated animals.

Chris Packham Report

DopethronePunkUK 1 month ago

I have a tattoo of a human hand holding a dog paw, i may follow it up with this one to represent all wild animals.

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#6

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

This orphaned baby gorilla on sale in a Cameroon bush meat market was traded by the photographer for a worthless ring and taken to a sanctuary at the other end of the country. It died a few months later.

Karl Ammann Report

DopethronePunkUK 1 month ago

Wrong on so many levels, look at the little thing dwarfed by the humans around it, so out of place, i'm glad it was rescued and spent its last few months being looked after, so sad the little one died though, RIP beautiful baby.

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#7

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

Thandi, the female white rhino who lost her horn to poachers, has become a symbol of survival in the fight against rhino poaching.

Neil Aldridge Report

Gina Bean 1 month ago

A coworker of mine just went to Africa and she said that almost all of the Rhinos are under 24 hour guarded watch. It's so sad and so scary that these amazing animals cannot live freely in the wild because of greedy, evil human beings.

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#8

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

Tony Fitzjohn, conservationist, and protege of George Adamson, with Jipe, a lion he raised from orphaned cub to full adult in three years and then released back into the wild. Jipe successfully bred and raised cubs in Tsavo, Kenya, but was murdered by poachers soon after this photo was taken.

Olly & Suzi Report

Meeow 1 month ago

Damn, that's so sad.

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#9

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

Fennec foxes are captured for the illegal pet trade. This three-month-old pup was for sale in a market in southern Tunisia.

Bruno D'Amicis Report

Catlady6000 1 month ago

Without the poverty, there would be less trade. I would do what I had to to feed my kids, and learn to live with a guilty conscience

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#10

Photographers Against Wildlife Crime

The smouldering remains of an area of Amazon rainforest cleared for cattle ranching in Acre, Brazil.

Charlie Hamilton James Report

Ingrid Tsai 1 month ago

STOP CLEARING THE FORESTS!!!! PLEASE!!!!

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