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Photographer Travels To The Coldest Village On Earth Where The Temperature Can Reach -71.2C (-96F)
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Photographer Travels To The Coldest Village On Earth Where The Temperature Can Reach -71.2C (-96F)

If you think that winter has already come to your city, pictures from Oymyakon, Russia, the coldest village on Earth, might change your mind. With the lowest temperature of −71.2 °C (−96 °F), recorded in 1924, and the average for January being -50°C (-60°F), this village is the coldest permanently inhabited place on this planet. New Zealand-based photographer Amos Chapple decided to go on a two-day journey from Yakutsk, the coldest major city on Earth, to capture what everyday life is like in Oymyakon.

I was wearing thin trousers when I first stepped outside into – 47 °C (-52°F). I remember feeling like the cold was physically gripping my legs, the other surprise was that occasionally my saliva would freeze into needles that would prick my lips”, the photographer told to weather.com.

The photographer recalls that the hardest thing was not the cold itself, but that his camera’s focus and zoom rings would occasionally freeze in place.

More info: amoschapplephoto.com (h/t: petapixel)

The Central Market In Yakutsk is full of fish and meat as the crops do not grow there

The ‘Road Of Bones’ is the only route to Oymyakon

Even the village sign reads ‘Omyakon, The Pole Of Cold’

A woman walks by a frozen house located in the village center

A thick layer of fur keeps these dogs warm

Most toilets are built outside, because the frozen ground makes it impossible to build indoor plumbing

Local farmer keeps his cows warm at night by tucking them away in this barn

The only working shop in Oymyakon provides the villagers with everything they need

Cars can only be placed in heated garages. The ones left outside must keep running, otherwise they won’t restart

A coal heating plant keeps the villagers warm

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Emina Becirevic
Community Member
5 years ago

Oh boy, outside toilets... At this temperature...

LizzyM
Community Member
5 years ago

Imagine having diarrhea!

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LizzyM
Community Member
5 years ago

Why do people voluntarily choose to live there? Doesnt seem like a large community either, why not move somewhere slightly warmer and a bit more populated? (But hey, if they're happy living there, kudo's to then!)

Bistra Stoimenova
Community Member
5 years ago

Most people that live there are A - native inhabitants, descendants of the local tribes, or B descendants of people that were sentenced convicts during the Tsarist or Communist Russia. You are right, few people would consider moving to live there but once born there, you have few options to move away. The nearest big city is also very cold, as far as I know :)

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Aunt Messy
Community Member
5 years ago

You'd have to be off your nut to live there. I grew up in Northern Alberta, and the coldest weather I've ever been out in was...below -50C. It was hard to tell because the thermometer bottomed out at -50. That kind of cold is physically painful, no matter how well you're dressed. Exposed flesh freezes in seconds. Death from exposure can happen in minutes. No thank you.

Julia L
Community Member
5 years ago

It's not a deadly place at all. I was born little bit west and love frost! At temperature -45C I and many children played on a street with snow. My chilhood was excellent, and frost give you reason running quicker, i.e. to like sport!

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Emina Becirevic
Community Member
5 years ago

Oh boy, outside toilets... At this temperature...

LizzyM
Community Member
5 years ago

Imagine having diarrhea!

Load More Replies...
LizzyM
Community Member
5 years ago

Why do people voluntarily choose to live there? Doesnt seem like a large community either, why not move somewhere slightly warmer and a bit more populated? (But hey, if they're happy living there, kudo's to then!)

Bistra Stoimenova
Community Member
5 years ago

Most people that live there are A - native inhabitants, descendants of the local tribes, or B descendants of people that were sentenced convicts during the Tsarist or Communist Russia. You are right, few people would consider moving to live there but once born there, you have few options to move away. The nearest big city is also very cold, as far as I know :)

Load More Replies...
Aunt Messy
Community Member
5 years ago

You'd have to be off your nut to live there. I grew up in Northern Alberta, and the coldest weather I've ever been out in was...below -50C. It was hard to tell because the thermometer bottomed out at -50. That kind of cold is physically painful, no matter how well you're dressed. Exposed flesh freezes in seconds. Death from exposure can happen in minutes. No thank you.

Julia L
Community Member
5 years ago

It's not a deadly place at all. I was born little bit west and love frost! At temperature -45C I and many children played on a street with snow. My chilhood was excellent, and frost give you reason running quicker, i.e. to like sport!

Load More Replies...
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