Dr. Margaret McCollum, a general practitioner, met Oswald Laurence in 1992 on a tour to Morocco. He had just left acting and was working for a tour and cruise company. The two fell in love, got married, and had been living together in north London until Oswald’s death in 2007.

“It was devastating to lose him,” Dr McCollum told the BBC. “He had a great zest for life.”

One of the things that helped the widow in dealing with the grieving process was hearing her late husband’s voice in the tube. You see, Oswald’s voice recording was used on the northbound Northern Line to tell passengers to “mind the gap.”However, it was eventually phased out until only the Embankment underground station used it.

Dr. McCollum said she traveled the London Underground a lot via Embankment. “Since he died, I would sit and wait for the next train until I heard his voice.”

But one time she was stunned finding that the public announcement wasn’t there anymore.

“I inquired and I was told there was a new digital system and they could not get his voice on it.” But that wasn’t the end of it.

A recent Twitter thread revisited the heartwarming story, reminding us about the faith-in-humanity we sometimes need to restore in ourselves. Told by historian John Bull, it perfectly captures the feelings of love and losing a loved one, which often go together.

Image credits: garius

Image credits: garius

Image credits: garius

Image credits: bbc

Image credits: garius

Image credits: bbc

Image credits: garius

Image credits: bbc

Image credits: garius

Image credits: garius

Image credits: bbc

Image credits: garius

Image credits: garius

Image credits: Paul Wilkinson

Image credits: garius

Image credits: Ewan Munro

Image credits: garius

Bull told Bored Panda that he’s known this story for years, actually. “I think a lot of people in the world of London transport do, it’s just something that doesn’t come up in casual conversation,” he said. “I wrote about it now, just because I was reminded of it while passing through Embankment myself last week and hearing the announcement again.”

He was kinda surprised with the way the internet has reacted to it, but that reaction’s also a reflection of why he shared it. “For a lot of people, for various reasons, the world feels like a dark, unkind place right now. I just wanted to remind people that small acts of kindness are all around us, and when humans work together we can make a difference, even if it’s for just one person.”

Nigel Holness, the former London Underground director, also confirmed this happened. “Transport for London were approached by the widow of Oswald Laurence to see whether she could get a copy of the iconic ‘mind the gap’ announcement her husband made over 40 years ago,” he said. “We were very touched by her story, so staff tracked down the recording.”

People were incredibly moved by the heartwarming story

Image credits: locationsphotos

Image credits: Er_Nope

Image credits: NatChoTelly

Image credits: bennyboyyorks

Image credits: stevimp

Image credits: mbooton

Image credits: LondonComment

Image credits: MrTimDunn

Image credits: bar_mum

Image credits: alan_dace

Image credits: vratcliffe82

Image credits: Banjoman2011

Image credits: darkalley11

John Bull also wanted to use the opportunity to talk about the Age UK campaign to help make sure old people don’t spend Christmas alone.

According to a new survey, this special holiday is the loneliest time of the year for over 1.5 million older people, with those who have been widowed feeling it the most.

Age UK and local Age UKs across the country work hard to fight loneliness through a range of services and activities, such as lunch clubs, exercise classes and advice and support when there’s no one else to turn to.

Age UK is encouraging people to get behind its campaign and to donate to help ensure that the charity’s essential services and support can continue to be there for older people and their families and friends. For more information, click here.