Isn’t it weird that humans learn how to use language to communicate with others without needing to put in that much effort? But if we want to write and read or to perfect it and make our linguistic abilities more sophisticated, we need to actually study the language. Despite starting strong and already being able to talk and understand others in childhood, we spend years learning our languages at school, but in the end, not everyone manages to acquire it completely.

Those who are more receptive to languages often get irritated by the mistakes other people make in spoken or written language. It really shows in a Reddit thread where a person asked “What is something that most people don’t use correctly?” and half of the answers consisted of people naming misused words and grammar errors others make.

Image credits: Martha Soukup

More info: Reddit

#1

The phrase “I couldn’t care less”

Most Americans I’ve heard say, “I could care less”. Like cmon you’re using that all wrong!!

Ok_Party8053 Report

Kona Pake
Community Member
7 months ago

I ain’t doing nothing.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#2

Incredibly: should’ve. I’ve seen a ton of people write “should of” when they mean should’ve (as in should have) and in my opinion that’s worse than confusing “then/than”.

d**klong25 Report

H Edwards
Community Member
7 months ago

It comes from the way it's pronounced, and it's exclusively a mistake that native English speakers make.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#3

The word loose. They mistake it for lose

Ghostitron20897 Report

H Edwards
Community Member
7 months ago

One of the most common spelling confusions in the English language, apparently. It's quite easy to see why, I suppose. The one that really grinds my gears for some reason is 'shepard' instead of 'shepherd' when people start discussing their dogs.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#4

The they're/there/their and to/too/two. It's a pet peeve of mine when people say "This is to boring." In any situation when they use the wrong "to." My mates had taken University-level English classes in highschool yet they still make the "there" or "to" mistakes, and it makes my blood boil.

Neollia10 Report

Mary Rose Kent
Community Member
7 months ago

I didn’t even go to college and I still manage to use the right one every single time.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#5

Less vs. fewer. Less is for uncountable nouns: you have less time, less pain, less work to do. Fewer is for countable nouns: you have fewer apples, fewer cans of soup, fewer distractions. People usually use less when they should use fewer; it rarely happens the other way around. People will say "there are less cars on the road," but they probably won't say "there is fewer traffic." There is a related problem with much vs. many. To be fair, what is countable and uncountable can get complicated, and it's easy to make mistakes (I do it too). You can't have fewer money, you can only have fewer dollars and cents (money, amusingly, is uncountable). You can't have fewer pizza, but you can have fewer pizzas (pluralization of something uncountable makes it countable).

Cdesese Report

John C
Community Member
7 months ago

I understand this is technically correct, but not only does this not impede effective communication (you know exactly what they meant) but since language evolves over time, I suspect in the future this distinction will be eliminated and these two words cross-pollenating one another will be considered acceptable, or if nothing else slang.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#6

The pedal next to the gas is not the break pedal

millenniumxl-200 Report

Paul C.
Community Member
7 months ago (edited)

It could be, if you push it to hard! You see what I did their? Im pleased with that. :-)

View More Replies...
View more comments
#7

I'm gonna go get an expresso and excetera.

tee142002 Report

Mary Rose Kent
Community Member
7 months ago

Espresso, yes / et cetera, YES

View more comments
#8

Your/You’re.

Bunnnnii Report

Kona Pake
Community Member
7 months ago

Yore.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#9

Than/then

Vivus_Mortuus Report

Hayhaypaula
Community Member
7 months ago

"Than" is used when you are comparing two items. Use "then" when you are discussing order in time. Examples: I ate pizza, and "then" took a nap! I ate more pizza "than" wings!

View More Replies...
View more comments
#10

Apostrophes.

Warpmind Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

Apostrophes are such a pain to explain as they can indicate two things - possession (such as Robert's book or Mary's bicycle) and abbreviation (where letters have been omitted should've, would've, could've, won't). Then you have to try to explain it's to someone. Is it possession or abbreviation? Its is possession and it's is abbreviation. And they go "what?".

View More Replies...
View more comments
#11

grumpyoldmanBrad said:
Affect/Effect

Daddict replied:
It's so easy.

Affect is a verb. Except when it's a noun.

Effect is a noun. Except when it's a verb.

No idea why people mix these up.

grumpyoldmanBrad Report

memyselfandI
Community Member
7 months ago

Affect is first, effect is second. Usually in casual conversation, affect will be a verb (her emotions affected the decision), and effect will be a noun (the effect was that she got two dozen donuts instead of one). Affect as a noun means sort of your vibe, as in (his affect was one of confidence), effect as a verb is basically the same as affect, doing something that changes something else, but effect is usually used when making that specific change was the goal (he wanted to effect a change in legislation). Affect as a verb means your action has some consequences in the situation around you, effect as a verb means you are doing something for the specific purpose of making that change. One is unintentional, the other is intentional. Hope that clears things up.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#12

APART

If you participated in something you were “a part” of it. If you are “apart” from something or someone you are deliberately not a part.

sheinvitedthewildin Report

ZAPanda
Community Member
7 months ago

My pet peeve is "alot". "Allot" means to award or to allocate. "A Lot" means "a bunch".

View More Replies...
View more comments
#13

"Anyways" the correct word is "anyway". Anyway already denotes any possible way. Adding an S does nothing other than show your ignorance.

SyxEight Report

H Edwards
Community Member
7 months ago

I see this as a kind of colloquialism. I use it even though I know it's not technically correct.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#14

Literally

JoshdaBoss1234 Report

Pickles
Community Member
7 months ago

Webster's dictionary has literally changed the definition of the word to include today's people's common misuse of the word as "figuratively" or "virtually". So the word has literally list all meaning.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#15

The word “cavalry.” People often say “Calvary” instead.

W0nk0_the_Sane00 Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

You could be crucified for making that mistake!

View More Replies...
View more comments
#16

Same with saying “payed” instead of “paid”. This one drives me insane the most.

D3ATHfromAB0V3x Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

Nothing wrong with them saying it, it's when the write it down that it annoys me!

View More Replies...
View more comments
#17

*exspecially

Objective-Highlight4 Report

R Carson
Community Member
7 months ago

How 'bout-Can I axe you something?

View More Replies...
View more comments
#18

breath, breathe, and breathing. Makes me wanna kill someone more than I already do.

C0deMasterYT Report

Mary Rose Kent
Community Member
7 months ago

I love it when people get super riled up about misused phonemes!

View More Replies...
View more comments
#19

AtomBombBaby42042 said:
Woman/women!

smooshf**kie replied:
Right! But people don't get man/men wrong.

Why is it that people can tell the difference between man/men but not woman/women?

AtomBombBaby42042 Report

Wondering Alice
Community Member
7 months ago

Is this a thing? I can't recall seeing someone mix up woman and women. Is it happening a lot?

View More Replies...
View more comments
See Also on Bored Panda
#20

;

NikkieBikkie6425 Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

Separator between statements. In English and in programming languages.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#21

Weary vs wary too. I am weary of the misuse of homynyms.

Lexi_Banner Report

Tom Hanlin
Community Member
7 months ago

Weary is not a homonym of wary but, for all I know, could be a homynym, whatever that is.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#22

Punctuation

Apprehensive-Star-45 Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

You missed a full-stop there.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#23

Grammer

Emny45 Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

Which one? The one on my father's side or the one on my mother's?

View More Replies...
View more comments
#24

Barley when they mean barely. That one grinds my gears.

Sss00099 Report

Kona Pake
Community Member
7 months ago

Barely flower.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#25

"Begs the question"

It doesn't mean to raise the question.

It's a form of circular reasoning where the argument requires the conclusion to be true, rather than the argument supporting the conclusion.

DJPho3nix Report

Mike Beck
Community Member
7 months ago

Interesting. I have only ever heard it used as "raises the question" and never the other.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#26

The colon and semicolon.

Bubbaganewsh Report

Fat Harry
Community Member
7 months ago

It's not even hard. A semicolon is a punctuation mark used to separate items in a list or to link independent but related clauses, whereas the colon is the longest part of the large intestine.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#27

People say: You can't have your cake and eat it too.

The traditional correct phrase is: You can't eat your cake and have it too.

Nowadays the two ways of saying it are pretty much used interchangeably.

Legal-Knievel Report

Kanuli
Community Member
7 months ago

Does it make a difference though? Philosophically? In Switzerland we have that saying aswell, slightly different. There’s a bread called weggli, and it often has a chocolate coin(foifer). And usually when you share one get the weggli, the other the coin: thus :you can’t have the weggli and the foifer.

View More Replies...
View more comments
See Also on Bored Panda
#28

The English language

No-Incident-7957 Report

Skara Brae
Community Member
7 months ago

One time I passed a couple of college students. One was from Iran and the other from Korea. They were speaking in English, but their accents were so strong I could barely understand more than every third word. I was impressed how they could understand each other.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#29

The words “everyday” and “awhile”.

CptnSAUS Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

But "everyday" means something different to "every day", which is what I assume you are getting at.

View More Replies...
View more comments
#30

Plurals

GothamGreenGoddess Report

Robert T
Community Member
7 months ago

Plurals in different languages are quite strange. In English is usually by adding an "s" or "es". In Danish it seems to be by adding "er". In French they start messing about with the words before it as well.

View More Replies...
View more comments

Note: this post originally had 32 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.