English is a mystery to all of us, whether you've been speaking it since day one, or you've just started to learn it. From its bizarre spelling rules to its free-for-all grammar, it's a daily struggle just trying to form sentences that make sense. No wonder people are turning to emoji to express their thoughts.


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Unless you live in the Tibetan mountains or belong to an Amazonian tribe, you've definitely come across English. It's the most widely-studied language in the world, making it a connecting language between countries, and even continents. Thanks to the rise of American power and influence, English has spread like wildfire across the globe through movies, music, and literature. That doesn't mean it's any walk in the park.

Have a look at some of the most frustrating moments English has brought us below, and check out our similar posts on French and German.

#1

English Language

shadowwraiths Report

Intensive Panda 10 months ago

and it makes a whole different sentence every time

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#2

English Language

iowahawkblog Report

Yvonne Bernal 10 months ago

They should have said “I slit a sheet, a sheet I slit. Upon the slitted sheet I sit"

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#3

English Language

mattandersonbbc Report

Hans 10 months ago

Never thought about it. Awesomely old straight vivid logic.

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#4

English Language

just-shower-thoughts Report

Hans 10 months ago

At least it will make "boom" if you are not careful.

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#5

English Language

Report

Carlota Ocón 10 months ago

In spanish we don't say ananas, we say piña

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#6

English Language

languagelinguistics Report

Hans 10 months ago

Well, isn't this the case with many words? Like terrific, or also awful. an aweful beach, to my understanding is one that you do not want to visit, while you definitely want to hand out on an awefully great beach. An if you hear of a terrific beach, you better ask twice. Any native speakers here to explain? Even though I am afraid this might even be different in AE and BE.

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#7

English Language

thessalian Report

Vanessa 10 months ago

kinda happen with all languages?

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#8

English Language

ikimaru Report

Hans 10 months ago

We happy that they did not use emoticon precursors.

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#9

English Language

gracieness Report

Yvonne Bernal 10 months ago

Sometimes we spell it "baloney" - And baloney and money don't rhyme either (sigh)

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#10

English Language

laslanguesromanze Report

Claudia Machado 10 months ago

Queue is a queue where Q is the first and the others are waiting in queue for their chance to appear.

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