School teaches us many subjects and provides different skills, but not everyone is lucky enough to get a proper glimpse into the bewildering world of finance. And as some of us are still lost in the darkness of financial housekeeping, TikTok users come flying with their genius advice regarding all things money and cover aspects of when, what and how. 

TikTok not only instructs us how to dance, lipsync, or put makeup—it is now educating us on how to maneuver through the world of personal finance. 

You can check out some of the ingenious insights given by TikTokers and let us know what you think or even share your own tips and tricks on how to deal with day-to-day money, saving, and retirement.

#1

Why You Have To Be Careful Not To Use More Than 10-30% Of Your Credit Allowance And Pay Your Balance In Full Every Month

Why You Have To Be Careful Not To Use More Than 10-30% Of Your Credit Allowance And Pay Your Balance In Full Every Month

"-Hey, have you got some money I can borrow?
-Sure, you can have up to $1,000.
-Cool, I’ll take $100, please!
-Are you sure you don’t want more?!
-Yeah, because I know if I use more than 10-30% of my allowance credit amount, you'll damage my credit score.
-Oh, someone thinks they’re clever. By the way, you only have to pay me back $10 at the end of the month.
-No, I’m going to pay it all back in full (at the end of the month) to avoid paying any interest, thank you very much.” [watch the video here]

@marktilbury Report

Winter ️
Community Member
3 months ago

This must be an American thing, 'cause i don't get their credit card system

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#2

Clever And Understandable Way Of How To Save Some Money Every Day

Clever And Understandable Way Of How To Save Some Money Every Day

“Let's talk about an easy way to save money. This is in your checking account at the end of the day: move the last digit to your savings account. Do this every day and you barely feel it. After 7 days, I was able to save 24 bucks x each week—that’s a total of $1,248 a year.” [watch the video here]

@budgetbrospodcast Report

Guy MacGregor
Community Member
3 months ago

That's actually not that stupid

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#3

Buying A Used Car Rather Than The Latest One Will Save You Money

Buying A Used Car Rather Than The Latest One Will Save You Money

“If you just graduated college, let's say you're still living at home and you get your first job, a car is like, one of the worst investments you could ever make. To get a new car, which automatically depreciates, by the way, at least 10% the second you drive it out of the lot—buy a used car. Even if you buy a car that is like 2 years older than the newest one, you’re saving like 40% off there.” [watch the video here]

@projectaeronaut Report

Paul Budhram
Community Member
3 months ago

great advice

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#4

Know What An Emergency Fund Is And Have It Ready For Rainy Days

Know What An Emergency Fund Is And Have It Ready For Rainy Days

“Can you elaborate what an emergency fund is? An emergency fund is six to eight months worth of your essential expenses saved in a bank account or an asset that is easily transferred into cash. Your essential expenses is everything that your life depends on: food, your rent, mortgage, commute—you name it. Your essential expenses don't include impulse shopping on Amazon, for example, so that's good news. What you want to do before you start investing of any kind is to sit down and calculate how much money you are spending on essential expenses and save up to six to eight months of that in your emergency fund. That way, if s*** hits the fan and you lose your job or something like that, you don't have to panic sell your investment assets because you have a safety net to rely on during the rainy day.” [watch the video here]

@kianadanial Report

Gehtdich Nixan
Community Member
3 months ago

well, since my "essential expenses" are like 70% of my salary (rent is expensive where i live), it would take me nearly a decade to save that amount of money. this "advice" is pretty useless unless you earn a lot of money anyway.

Hugo Raible
Community Member
1 month ago

It's especially useful if you are short on money. And you would need one year, not 10.

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AntiAntiVaxx
Community Member
3 months ago

Always have 6 months of income saved in the bank

El Dee
Community Member
2 months ago

For those who REALLY need this it just isn't possible. It's taken me all of my life until the point my mortgage was paid off to have ANY emergency money whatever..

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Sasha Kuleshov
Community Member
3 months ago

Unless your poor :(

oddkiddo
Community Member
3 months ago

Oh, so I don't have to sell my investment assets. Got it.

Weezie Ray
Community Member
2 months ago

I laughed out loud, because I could feel the derisive sarcasm rolling off your comment in waves. I'm right there with ya, buddy. This advice is for upper middle class people, not the working poor like us. To us it's just irrelevant bull$hit. heh

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Izzy_
Community Member
2 months ago

Except when a pandemic hits XD I had an emergency fund for 6 months that's all dried up now, my business is closed, but who plans for a freaking worldwide pandemic??

Sein Maestro
Community Member
2 months ago

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who? all of us preppers. We prepped for a world without money. so the lack of it was the least of our worries. it was either zombies or some other sh*t lol

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Two4mirth
Community Member
3 months ago

try that with a mortgage, two kids, two cars, student loans and everything else! Not gonna happen. We are lucky to have one month and that's pushing it.

Thomas Duncan
Community Member
2 months ago

I hate this BS trope...been seeing this 'advice' for 5 decades now. Great if you start adulthood with NO SCHOOL DEBT and live at your parent's house until you have this much saved already..Basically have to enter adulthood from an upper-middle class background for this to be any good.

Wim Lammens
Community Member
2 months ago

In many countries, "school debt" is not a reality most people have to live with, because they have high-quality education available that is either free or at at least affordable. A year's worth of university tuition fees came down to about $800 to $1,000. When I started working after 5 years of university, I had two degrees and no school debt whatsoever. That makes a very large difference.

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Caroline Sinclair
Community Member
2 months ago

Advice like this, impossible to follow for the vast majority of people, makes me both angry and sad 😡😢😔

Patricia Healton
Community Member
2 months ago

I can barely pay my bills let alone save that much money.

kjorn
Community Member
2 months ago

yeah... everyone have the luxury to put on the side 6 to 8 month worth of salary!!! Yeah... right... for be able to do that you must earn a lot! and if you earn a lot basically you should not have money problem.

Wilson Santiago
Community Member
2 months ago

I think the advice of an emergency fund is good, but the amount of six to eight months is absurdly high. Most other financial planners recommend 2-3 months to be saved, not 2/3 of a year's income.

Holly Allen
Community Member
3 months ago

We have our bank automatically transfer $10 from checking to savings each pay period so that we don't even think about it. It will take a while but we're getting there

Legen ( wait for it ) dary
Community Member
2 months ago

10 it's better then nothing. You go girl!!! I have a friend, he complained that he is too poor to save, but spend 120 in cigarettes a month.

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New Prometheus
Community Member
2 weeks ago

Six months is a lot... I have three month's worth.

Jo Choto
Community Member
2 months ago

I just don't think most people are able to do this.

Maria
Community Member
3 months ago

Six months of savings is a great goal, but if that seems impossible don't give up on saving some money. Working with homeless people I saw lots of people who'd lost jobs and had no savings to tide them over until they found another. Even one months rent in savings could save your bacon.

Sarah Kohrmann
Community Member
1 month ago

It's a great goal, surely, but it's completely infeasible for the majority of adults in the US.

Lea S.
Community Member
1 month ago

Of course - putting money into savings is ALWAYS something you should try to do. But people who say 'always have six months worse in an account' (I saw someone who said it) - how? You can't always have six months worth in an account. First of all it takes time to get that much saved up, and then if you have to dip into it for an emergency, it takes time to build it back up. Unless you turn 18 with an untouched account that is MORE than six months of your income - it is impossible.

Martha Higgins
Community Member
2 months ago

Always pay off your credit card EVERY month, that will improve your credit score, and NEVER be late making payments to anyone, that will destroy your credit rating. You'll get better interest rates when you finally go to buy your house!

Martha Higgins
Community Member
2 months ago

Another great way to save is buying used furniture at estate sales or auctions. Learn what pieces are good quality (not IKEA) and become informed. You can get beautiful china and cutlery at auctions for a fraction of what plastic stuff costs new and it will last. I am still using the plain white Corningware Centura dishes and Oneida stainless flatware I bought 55 years ago and it still looks like new. Don't buy junk stuff.

Robert T
Community Member
2 months ago

Better advice would be to not blow all your money as soon as you get it. Save for things that you want and only buy them when you can comfortably afford them. If you get in to the habit of doing that, then you won't run into problems when there are things that have to be paid for in a hurry, such as repairs to houses, cars etc. If as soon as you have a bit of spare cash you go and blow it all on the latest phone, TV, etc, you will never build up enough of a buffer to smooth the bumpy road of life.

Legen ( wait for it ) dary
Community Member
2 months ago

Is essential expense kids activities or fitness for me, to which I have a contract and can only let go if I give up on the contract between 1 to 3 months before ?

Computernaut
Community Member
2 months ago

Anyone else think that lady looks a bit like Michael Jackson?

Coco Chanel
Community Member
3 months ago

Always have some money saved up, no matter what. If more people did this in the '20s, the Great Depression might not have been so bad.

kexoy
Community Member
3 months ago

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nice good

kexoy
Community Member
3 months ago

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My Boy pal makes $seventy five/hour on net. he has been job less for six months. However he earns$16453 genuinely working at the internet for some hours. Immediately join from the sourceHEE...........................Www.JOB.WORKS76.COM

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#5

How Much Really You Need To Save To Buy A Home And How The Down Payments Are Calculated

How Much Really You Need To Save To Buy A Home And How The Down Payments Are Calculated

"How much do you need to save to buy a $450,000 home? This is my second exercise to help you guys understand how it's all calculated. So if you're buying a $450,000 home, you can still find a loan program that allows for as little as 3% to 3.5% down payment. That means for this house, you need to save about $13,500 to $16,000 to put down the very minimum, then there’s your closing cost, we know that's about 2% to 3% of the loan amount. So let's say you do the $16,000 down payment—that leaves your loan amount at $434,000 and we know closing costs can be up to 3% of that. That means you need to save an additional $13,000 for your closing cost. Lastly we need to add the $400 to $600 on a home inspection, so all in all, for a $450,000 home, approximately, you need to save about $29,600 to cover all your costs.” [watch the video here]

@vanessaaragonrealtor Report

Helena R
Community Member
3 months ago

In the USA you can buy a house with a 3.5% deposit/down payment is that correct?

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#6

Think Twice Before Signing Up For Store Credit Cards

Think Twice Before Signing Up For Store Credit Cards

“-Thanks for shopping with us! Would you like to sign up for our credit card?
- Nah, I don't shop here often.
-Are you sure? You'll get rewarded every time you shop!
-Oh, I'm sure! The average interest rate of your credit card is typically twice that of an average card.
-OK, but what if we can extend you a credit limit of $100?
-That’s so low! If I actually signed up, that would bring down the average of my credit lines. Which could be bad for my credit!
-Okay, what store credit cards are actually good, then? Only places where I shop at all the time… and I'm always paying it off in full.” [watch the video here]

@humphreytalks Report

Michaela
Community Member
3 months ago

And please don’t get mad at the salesperson for asking. Most are required to ask.

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#7

Know The Difference Between A Credit Card And Debit Card And Choose Wisely Which One To Use And How

Know The Difference Between A Credit Card And Debit Card And Choose Wisely Which One To Use And How

“What's the difference between a credit card and a debit card? When using a credit card, you’re kind of like borrowing money from the bank to purchase something, but you have to pay them back later. What about a debit card? When you use a debit card, you can only spend the amount that you have in your checking account. So which one should I use? I like using credit cards because it builds your credit, but you have to be responsible so you don't get into credit card debt.” [watch the video here]

@calltoleap Report

Nevits Yibble
Community Member
3 months ago

In cases of fraud, your liability with a credit card is very minimal. Not so with a debit card - which should never, ever be used for purchases of any kind. Use the bank's money when buying stuff, not your own. You have a lot more protections, and it builds credit. Then pay the card in full each month with YOUR money.

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#8

Use Money-Saving Hacks That Work Not Only For Students

Use Money-Saving Hacks That Work Not Only For Students

“These are my greatest money-saving tips for broke teenagers or just people trying to save some money. Number 1, food: stop going out to eat so much and if you do go to a restaurant, do not get pop, get water and unless you're getting an appetizer as your meal, getting an appetizer on top of a full meal is very expensive. If your friends want to go to Starbucks but you don't want to spend money—just get water. You are a student—take advantage of that! Literally everywhere you go probably has a student discount—it is not embarrassing or weird to ask if they have a student discount. Buy your makeup at Winners, Sephora is so expensive and Winners has the exact same stuff. Get a tax-free savings account as soon as you turn 18. Ordering $300 worth of clothes that you don't need from Shein, even though you're getting a lot, you're still spending $300—prioritize what you need. Have fun!” [watch the video here]

@spencer.barbosa Report

Coco Chanel
Community Member
3 months ago

I agree, you don't need to get more expensive brand names like Sephora just because your friends do.

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#9

Not Drinking Alcohol Could Save You Some Money

Not Drinking Alcohol Could Save You Some Money

"Dry months are an easy way to save money for other goals. 2 bottles of wine a week @ $15 each= $30 a week / $120 a month. 3 dry months in the year = $360 for a goal." [watch the video here]

@makerealcents Report

Nevits Yibble
Community Member
3 months ago

A month without wine? Big nope

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#10

Be Aware Of The UPS And Downs Of The Stock Market

Be Aware Of The UPS And Downs Of The Stock Market

“So here’s something to keep in mind—anytime you see your stock starting to go down, when you see something like pretty bad—it sucks, go back 5 days ago, go back a month, that is still pretty bad, and then we're about 6 months ago? Not really looking that bad, but what about 5 years ago? Wait, nevermind! And that’s what you're worried about right now! Listen, short-term is going to suck, but long-term, when you look at the big picture, a drop like this is really not that big of a deal. It’s not that scary. Just buy the dip! And then just wait as long as possible.” [watch the video here]

@grahamstephan Report

Mewton’s Third Paw
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

Don’t panic sell. Just ride it out, there are always dips. It’s an opportunity to average down (buy more shares when they are low)

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#11

Find Out How Can You Start Paying Off Debts

Find Out How Can You Start Paying Off Debts

“Tips to pay off debt. You’ve got this! Start with the one with the highest interest rate. Contribute extra money towards the principal, make your monthly payments on time. Call and ask for a lower interest rate. The hardest part will be staying consistent. Set up automated payments so you don’t forget!” [watch the video here]

@herfirst100k Report

kjorn
Community Member
2 months ago

i prefer to pay the smallest one. it the easier one to get rid of and when it's finished you can take the money for t hat debt and put it on another one.

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#12

Maintaining A Healthy Credit Card Score By Trying To Spend No More Than 30% Of Your Credit Limit And Paying Off Your Balance In Full Each Month

Maintaining A Healthy Credit Card Score By Trying To Spend No More Than 30% Of Your Credit Limit And Paying Off Your Balance In Full Each Month

“If you want to buy a nice house or a nice car, you are going to need a good credit score, so I'm going to give you some tips on how you can do this. Once you turn 18, get yourself a credit card and you're going to be given a credit limit, which is how much you can spend in one month, so whatever your credit limit is, you only want to spend 30% of that and just always make sure to pay your credit card balance in full and on time every single month. I use the app Credit Karma to check my credit score.” [watch the video here]

@sarafinance Report

InfectedVoice
Community Member
3 months ago

It took me 15 years to get my credit score to perfect, the first time in my life it had been that, I was not so good in my younger years with borrowing and not paying it back, and it stung later on that's for sure. It feels good to have a perfect credit score now.

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#13

Young People Should Open Up A Credit Card, Open Up A Roth Ira, And Invest In Themselves

Young People Should Open Up A Credit Card, Open Up A Roth Ira, And Invest In Themselves

“Here are 3 things you should do as soon as you turn 18 in order to set yourself up for life. If you're over 18, then do these things today! Welcome to @paydaypursuit—the show that explains important financial ideas and side hustles in under 60 seconds. Number 1 is opening a credit card. In episode 7, I talked about how important the age of your credit history is when determining your credit score, just never spend money you don't have and pay it off in full every single month and you have a good credit score in no time. Number 2 is opening a Roth IRA! With just a part-time job and funding a Roth IRA with $360 every single month, you can literally set yourself up to be a millionaire. And lastly, number 3 is to invest in yourself! At 18, you have your whole life ahead of you. Use this time while you have a few bills and have a bit of money on things like books! One of my favorites is Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki! But I have a whole list of recommendations in my bio.” [watch the video here]

@paydaypursuit Report

InfectedVoice
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

Unless you know what you are doing, DO NOT invest in any sort of financial risk like a Roth IRA, this guy is selling something, no good.

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#14

Get Financially Literate To Understand What To Do With Your Spare Money

Get Financially Literate To Understand What To Do With Your Spare Money

“This is another question I get a lot and this is my answer. If you’re not financially literate, you should invest in your financial literacy self-education first. That means you should read these 5 books. This is a solid foundation that will cost you less than a hundred bucks in understanding money and making money work for you and the wealth mindset. If you are financially literate and you've got some of that spare change, then I would naturally just put that into long-term investment. So if I had an extra 500 to $1,000 a month I would just dump that into one of my long-term assets. Maybe if I'm feeling it, I want to put into my Roth IRA in Acorns or I want to buy some crypto, maybe I want dollar cost averaging to a little extra BTC or ETH. To me, once you get financially literate, you won't be asking questions like this anymore because you'll know exactly what you want to do because you have the mindset and the game plan.” [watch the video here]

@thelaymaninvestor Report

Nevits Yibble
Community Member
3 months ago

Honestly, financial planning and investing long in securities should be a *required* class in high school.

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#15

5 Investing Accounts And Their Main Purposes

5 Investing Accounts And Their Main Purposes

“5 investing accounts you should know about: Brokerage—taxable, no restriction on withdrawals, 401(K)—workplace retirement account, IRA—retirement account for anyone who earns income, HSA—tax-free money for medical expenses, B29—tax-free money for education.” [watch the video here]

@yoquierodineropodcast Report

Aliquid A
Community Member
3 months ago

Ok, Bored Panda... you do know that many of the people that come here aren't American right?

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#16

Learn What Compound Interest Is And How Your Money Grows Exponentially

Learn What Compound Interest Is And How Your Money Grows Exponentially

“-Would you rather have a million dollars today or a penny doubled for 30 days?
-A million dollars! A penny is nothing.
-See, that's where you're wrong. A penny doubled every day will make you money through compound interest.
-What's compound interest?
-Compound interest is the exponential growth of money. It's basically where your interest makes interest.
-Wow, you’ve lost me at exponential.
-Look, I'll just show you. On day 1 you have a penny, on day 2, you have two pennies, and on day 3, you have 4 pennies. Your gains are making you gains. This is compound interest.
-So if I chose the penny option, how much would I have after 30 days?
-Your money would continue to double until it reaches 5 million dollars.” [watch the video here]

@spencerhochhaus Report

Johnny
Community Member
3 months ago

Compound interest isn't magic, you still need to get a good interest rate if you want to make money. If you invest your money in a savings account today, you'll be losing money even with compound interest because interest rates are so low. If you put $1000 into a savings account with 0.5% APR interest, at the end of 10 years, you'll have earned $51.14 in interest if interest is compounded annually, and $51.27 if it's compounded daily.

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#17

Know Where To Get A Better Return On Your Money

Know Where To Get A Better Return On Your Money

“We know we're supposed to have a checking account and a savings account, but where are we supposed to keep these? Most people keep their checkings and savings in traditional banks like Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, where they're earning literal pennies for banking with them. You can keep your checking account with these traditional banks because that money's not staying in your account very long to earn anything substantial. But we want to move our savings, like our emergency fund, to a high-yield online savings account like Marcus, like Ally Bank, where the interest you're earning on your savings is 10 times the national average of a traditional bank. Like for Marcus and Ally—0.5% APY. There are a ton of these options online out there—don't overthink them just you want to check that there's no fees, no minimum deposit, that they're FDIC insured—just like your traditional bank and that they have same-day transfer. Don’t sleep on these, literally everybody who you know who knows anything about finances is using one of these, so go open one today. Thank me later.” [watch the video here]

@femme_financial Report

Mewton’s Third Paw
Community Member
3 months ago

“HaLf A pErCeNt Is HiGh yEiLd” - lying asś banks who don’t want you to invest your money

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#18

Understand Basics Of A 401k Account And Employer Match

Understand Basics Of A 401k Account And Employer Match

"Congratulations on the new job! It's your first day of work and HR asks you this question—are you going to sign up for the 401K plan? There's a match. You don’t know. Don’t panic, you have time to decide, but what is a 401k? It's an investment account for your retirement, which doesn't mean you have to wait till you're 60 years old. There are actually ways to get to this money much earlier, which most people don't realize. What does an employer match mean? Here's an example: Hi, Miss HR, I filled out all my paperwork for every paycheck and I indicated that I want 3% taken out of every paycheck and put into my 401k. Very good! And the company will match that exact amount that you're putting in and deposit it straight into your 401k. You don't have to pay taxes on it until the day that you take the money out. Now, don't forget to take your investments out. There is a menu of investments that are available to you. Talk to your 401k provider about what is best for you and your goals. Everyone is different.” [watch the video here]

@delyannethemoneycoach Report

InfectedVoice
Community Member
3 months ago

She looks like she may have graves disease, I hope she has had that checked out, my brother has it and it can cause problems.

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See Also on Bored Panda
#19

How To Buy A House Even Though You Can’t Afford The Full Cost With A Loan From A Bank

How To Buy A House Even Though You Can’t Afford The Full Cost With A Loan From A Bank

“What’s a mortgage in 15 seconds? This is you and you want to buy a house for 250,000 pounds, but you can't afford it all right now. So you pay what you can towards the house and then you ask the bank to pay the rest of what you can’t pay right now. Then you pay the bank directly back what they’ve paid towards the house and then you own it outright.” [watch the video here]

@themoneymovement Report

Keri O'Donnell
Community Member
3 months ago

...it was my understanding that this is what a mortgage is

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#20

There Are Pros And Cons Of Roth Ira (Individual Retirement Accounts)

There Are Pros And Cons Of Roth Ira (Individual Retirement Accounts)

“Roth IRA made easy! Roth individual retirement accounts are beloved in the retirement ecosystem, but just because it's Roth doesn't mean it's right for everyone. There's lots of benefits of Roth IRA accounts such as: your savings grow tax-free because everything you contribute is post-tax and you won't have to pay taxes when you take it out, there's no required minimum distribution, so if at 72, you don't need this money, it can keep growing forever. And, you can withdraw your contributions, not your earnings, but your contributions, at any time without penalty. But cons include having to pay the taxes upfront, a low contribution limit of $6,000 a year just like a traditional IRA account and income limits! If you make $140,000 you can't even have one of these. Roth IRAs are a great way to save for retirement especially if you're new to the workforce. Follow me for more retirement, money, and getting rich.” [watch the video here]

@yourrichbff Report

InfectedVoice
Community Member
3 months ago

Again, know what you're doing before investing.

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#21

How To Start Taking Care Of Your Finances From College

How To Start Taking Care Of Your Finances From College

"Top 5 things you should do in college to prepare you for the real world. (From a college grad who has her s*** together). 1. Get a credit card. I recommend the Discover Student Card or Capital One Student Card. You need credit the moment you graduate to get an apartment. 2. Open a high-yield savings account. Let your money make you money via interest. I recommend Marcus by Goldman Sachs or Ally Bank. 3. Open a ROTH IRA. even putting in $20 a month helps you to start saving for retirement. Use betterment.com. 4. Perfect your elevator pitch. You should be able to answer “tell me about yourself” at the drop of a dime. 5. Learn to budget. I recommend letting an app do it for you. Clarity Money is my personal favorite." [watch the video here]

@cedonifrancis Report

Mewton’s Third Paw
Community Member
3 months ago

“Learn to grovel at employers at the drop of a dime!”

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#22

Learn How Easy It Is To Open A Roth Ira

Learn How Easy It Is To Open A Roth Ira

“Here’s how to open a Roth IRA with Vanguard. First you're going to go to investor.vanguard.com. Then you're gonna click open an account. That will bring you here and you click let's open my account. You will be asked how you want to fund your Roth and here we are going to click the first one. After that, you will select that you are new here and that will bring you to this page and you simply press continue. This asks why are we investing. We're going to click retirement and the account type will be Roth IRA. Here’s a survey asking for the objective of your Roth, I’m gonna click growth and capital preservation and the source of funds is going to come from salary. Here you're gonna put your personal information step two, you’ll enter your bank information, you review and sign and then sign up for access.” [watch the video here]

@jamie.biz Report

Yeah, you heard
Community Member
3 months ago

This is not advice. Advice would be "you really ought to get a Roth IRA because..."

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