Bored Panda works better on our iPhone app
Continue in app Continue in browser
BoredPanda Add Post

The Bored Panda iOS app is live! Fight boredom with iPhones and iPads here.

People Like This School For Breaking Gender Stereotypes And Teaching Year 11 Girls Car Maintenance And DIY Skills
224points
8.1K
Automotive, DIY2 years ago

People Like This School For Breaking Gender Stereotypes And Teaching Year 11 Girls Car Maintenance And DIY Skills

While schools are doing a great job in teaching kids everything they need to know about math, literature, science, physical education, and everything in between, some claim that there isn’t enough of a focus on “life skills” like using particular power tools, fixing the sink, putting up a shelf, and whatnot.

Today, such lessons can very easily be learned on YouTube and other video platforms. Bored Panda has already written about a man who grew up without a dad and decided to give dadvice and teach life lessons to teens and young adults on his YouTube channel.

But one school decided to do just that. In particular, it taught its girl students the basics of car maintenance and automotive DIY.

Car maintenance and DIY are one of many skills that aren’t always taught in schools when they should be

Image credits: Stella Maris College

So, the Stella Maris College in Sydney, Australia has recently shared a post titled “Essential Life Skills” where it elaborated on some lessons that it provided to its female senior students.

The post explained that the school’s Year 11 girls were taught a number of essential DIY car maintenance skills by Galmatic, a hands-on car maintenance high school that offers incursions, workshops, and courses for women and teenagers.

So, this school decided to organize some car-oriented maintenance lessons to its Year 11 students

Image credits: Stella Maris College

The teachings included how to change a tire, how to check tire pressure, how to check oil and coolant levels, what to do in a car crash, and whatnot. This was done in hopes of encouraging independence, strength, and resourcefulness among young women.

The school organizes incursions (events on school grounds, as opposed to excursions) for groups of around 40 girls. So far, the reaction is positive and has proven to be effective in teaching necessary skills that are a must after leaving school. This is, of course, besides empowering them to be self-reliant in such situations.

Organized by Galmatic, a car maintenance school for women, these lessons aim to foster independence, strength, and resourcefulness

Image credits: Stella Maris College

Turns out, Galmatic teaches around 100,000 teenagers throughout Sydney every year. The main aim is so that the teens would feel comfortable and confident behind the wheel. Lessons like these also teach that problems should never be left unresolved as it poses a safety risk, among many other things.

The story drew the attention of a number of news sites, making headlines around the globe and also receiving positive reactions from people online who agree that these truly are essential skills.

The lessons teach how to change a tire, check oil levels, tire pressure, among many other things

Image credits: Galmatic Garage

One person pointed out that women are often left vulnerable in flat tire situations on more remote country roads, so having such know-how helps. Others pointed out that even if they don’t choose to drive, it still adds to one’s confidence and general knowledge of things like mechanics.

Now, in some parts of the globe, these life skills are incorporated into other curricula. In some countries, car maintenance is taught as part of driving school whereby people get their driver’s license. In some cases, these skills are also taught in vocational schools when studying mechanics, logistics, or similar topics.

What are your thoughts on this? How was your first time changing tires or doing car maintenance? Let us know in the comment section below!

Here’s how people reacted to this bit of news

Share on Facebook
You May Like
Popular on Bored Panda
Add your comment
Just JoLynn
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

The current title of this article states that "People like this school for breaking gendered stereotypes and teaching year 11 girls car maintenance and diy skills" but this school seems to have a very gendered dress code, so they're not really breaking stereotypes.

Kathryn Baylis
Community Member
2 years ago (edited) Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I graduated high school in 1978. Right before registration, I asked if I could take auto shop in my senior year—-already knew I was going to be on my own for a while before settling down—-and was told to choose a girls’ class instead, because auto shop was only for boys. Man, was I hopping mad! I told them that women—-and men—-do live on their own for years before getting married, and should learn basic home and car maintenance—-just like boys should learn how to cook and clean. The principal was not open to hearing me out, and repeated that I was not going to be allowed to take auto shop. I am soooo glad we’re more woke now.

Stannous Flouride
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I graduated in 1971band I asked to take Home Ec (as it was called in the olden days) to learn to sew. I got the same response.

Load More Replies...
Johnny
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

When I was in junior high, all students (male + female) went through a full set of Life Skills classes including Sewing, Cooking, Metal Shop, Wood Shop and Power Mechanics (where we completely stripped down and rebuilt a lawnmower engine). I still use the skills I learned in all of those classes.

Veronica Vatter
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I wish I could strip an engine. I can replace an oil pan and a muffler though 🤷

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
Just JoLynn
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

The current title of this article states that "People like this school for breaking gendered stereotypes and teaching year 11 girls car maintenance and diy skills" but this school seems to have a very gendered dress code, so they're not really breaking stereotypes.

Kathryn Baylis
Community Member
2 years ago (edited) Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I graduated high school in 1978. Right before registration, I asked if I could take auto shop in my senior year—-already knew I was going to be on my own for a while before settling down—-and was told to choose a girls’ class instead, because auto shop was only for boys. Man, was I hopping mad! I told them that women—-and men—-do live on their own for years before getting married, and should learn basic home and car maintenance—-just like boys should learn how to cook and clean. The principal was not open to hearing me out, and repeated that I was not going to be allowed to take auto shop. I am soooo glad we’re more woke now.

Stannous Flouride
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I graduated in 1971band I asked to take Home Ec (as it was called in the olden days) to learn to sew. I got the same response.

Load More Replies...
Johnny
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

When I was in junior high, all students (male + female) went through a full set of Life Skills classes including Sewing, Cooking, Metal Shop, Wood Shop and Power Mechanics (where we completely stripped down and rebuilt a lawnmower engine). I still use the skills I learned in all of those classes.

Veronica Vatter
Community Member
2 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I wish I could strip an engine. I can replace an oil pan and a muffler though 🤷

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
Popular on Bored Panda
Popular on Bored Panda
User Submissions
Also on Bored Panda
Also on Bored Panda