Blessed be those who didn't have to go through the trouble of learning the English language. Some might say that learning Japanese or Icelandic might be the most difficult task out there, but even the most complicated aspects of those languages have some kind of logic behind them. English grammar and the language itself, on the other hand, has some truly nonsensical characteristics to it and a plethora of arbitrary rules.

Those with English as their native language never have to consciously work through the kinks of spelling out Wednesday or why writers write, but fingers don't fing and grocers don't groce. Learning English as a secondary language is a real minefield once you figure out the basic grammar rules and step into more specific areas. And these people decided to point some of the most confusing things out there to prove their point. English is a weird language and at times makes no sense whatsoever, especially for a language that is so widespread.

#1

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

weeping-wandrian Report

Orillion
Community Member
1 year ago

Who's up for the defenestration of Donald Trump. I say we do it overmorrow.

A B C
Community Member
1 year ago

Better had it done ereyesterday

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Bleh
Community Member
1 year ago

There are so many people I wanna defenestrate

Enea
Community Member
1 year ago

In German, where you have words for Everything, it's literally called window-toppling. But it only has three renown applications in history (which is probably why there's an English word too): The first, second and third defenestration of Prague (the latter of which wasn't even a real defenestration, just plain murder).

Lucida
Community Member
1 year ago

In Swedish we have and use the words overmorrow (övermorgon) and ereyesterday (förrgår).

Miss Cris
Community Member
1 year ago

They exist and are used every day in most European (at least) languages. That's why a person is wondering why they don't exist in English. :)

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Anna Cserny
Community Member
1 year ago

My ancestor was defenestrated from Prague Castle in 1618. (Fun fact: he didn't die!)

BusLady
Community Member
1 year ago

Good thing. Or you wouldn't have been here. Lol

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Jeanette Griffin
Community Member
1 year ago

if we're defenestrating Trump, let's do it now!!

Shelli Perez Lorton
Community Member
1 year ago

I’ve had to resist the urge to defenestrate.... often.

wandile dludlu
Community Member
1 year ago

From Overmorrow, I'll start using the word Ereyesterday

Agata Sobańska
Community Member
1 year ago

Defenestration was a historic event, I believe many European countries have this word because of this (in Polish it's similar - defenestracja; comes from latin). It happened in Prague (3 times actually, but the 2nd had most impact worldwide since it's believed to be a reason for the 30 years war).

Miss Cris
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

In European Latin languages it exists, too. It has two meanings: literally means to throw someone out of the window but it's commonly used with the meaning of quickly putting someone out of his post, often in politics.

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Iris Engler
Community Member
1 year ago

I had no idea any of this words exists. I love languages

Kathy Schmittgens
Community Member
1 year ago

In Sierra Leone they just said “next tomorrow”

Ama Carey-Barr
Community Member
1 year ago

Ere yesterday? Used to be common in the west of Ireland among native Irish language speakers ( in Gaeltacht areas) & nearby communities. Elsewhere in Ireland too, perhaps. Distinctly a mark of the less-well-educated, possibly a hangover from much earlier usage in English. Huh..

Mark Johanen
Community Member
1 year ago

I'm tempted to say that I've never heard of the word "overmorrow" before, which of course doesn't mean that the word doesn't exist but I suspect it's a pretty obscure and rarely-used word. But then, how often do you hear someone say "defenstration"?

STU EVELYN FICEK
Community Member
1 year ago

The word for throwing someone out a window is yeet

S.
Community Member
1 year ago

Not just out of a window.

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Sue Bentley
Community Member
1 year ago

Fenster is the german word for window. No one uses it, but knowing that makes this word make sense.

Guglielmo Marconi
Community Member
1 year ago

It's latin.

Ama Carey-Barr
Community Member
1 year ago

“Defenestration” derives from the Latin “fenester” = window. With prefix “de-“ = from / out of. Also from the French “ fenetre” = window + “de-“ out of. You’re welcome. Welcome 🤗

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Matthieu Dequeker
Community Member
1 year ago

Hey, exactly the same word in french. Perhaps, centuries ago people realy enjoyed thowing things through windows like we do enjoy watching things being crushed on YouTube 🙃

Robyn Scott
Community Member
1 year ago

Is fenestration the act of throwing someone in a window?

ben boelter
Community Member
1 year ago

Defenestration caused three of the biggest international conflicts in History.

Jakub Wasilewski
Community Member
1 year ago

Defenestration is not even english word lol, but latin originally, used across whole europe (for ex in west slavic languages as well :) )

Phil Lawless
Community Member
1 year ago

Those words are so old I have never heard them.

Pandola
Community Member
1 year ago

this is beautiful

Dingbat Nix
Community Member
1 year ago

Self-defenestration- the act of throwing oneself out the window

Linda Robinett
Community Member
1 year ago

I think that word actually comes from a historical incident. It sounds like over use of Latin.

Emily
Community Member
1 year ago

balderdash anyone

Diane Epps
Community Member
1 year ago

Wonderful

MaryBored Pasaribu
Community Member
1 year ago

Hillarious

Fernanda Godinho
Community Member
1 year ago

Well, in portuguese we kind have both: defenestrar and "depois-de-amanha"

Crystal Lyons
Community Member
1 year ago

If only we had done it ereyesterday.

Arkeen
Community Member
1 year ago

"defenestration" is originally a french word. "Fenêtre" means "window". The circumflex accent indicates that in old french, "fenêtre" was written "fenestre".

Miss Cris
Community Member
1 year ago

Not French but Latin, that's why most romanic languages have a similar word to say "window": finestra, fiestra, etc.

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Jakub Wasilewski
Community Member
1 year ago

Not english word, it's from latin and Czech has it too and it's quite popular here :D

Katchen
Community Member
1 year ago

Dude, it’s an English word. A LOT of English words are from Latin. That doesn’t make them not English.

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GamerRain
Community Member
1 year ago

Woah

Gabriel Sbárbaro
Community Member
1 year ago

Overmorrow is not recognize by Google Translate... and, it's curious because in some areas, in spanish, defenestration is when someone talks trash about someone else...

Mewton’s Third Paw
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

Sounds German. Das fenster. Or is it die fenster? I forgot.

Woltax
Community Member
1 year ago

singular = das Fenster plural = die Fenster As you can see, both are right.

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Nicolas Leclair
Community Member
1 year ago

It comes from the French word défenestration, the verb is défenestrer, and the root is fenêtre, witch means window.

NMN
Community Member
1 year ago

Both French and English ones come from Latin.

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martin734
Community Member
1 year ago

Defenstrate comes from the french word fenestre, which translates as window.

NMN
Community Member
1 year ago

As Gugliermo said, comes from Latin

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Oerff On Tour
Community Member
1 year ago

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I agree with the last part. Therefore I use Android

Rachel Cobb
Community Member
1 year ago

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THIS! 😂🤣

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#2

English Nonsense

Suave-Matthews Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

*mind blown*

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To be fair, many linguists would easily find a logical answer to most of the problems presented in these messages, as English language has a lot of nuances (like words being borrowed from Latin and Greek, or the fact that some words had their origins lost or they ceased to be used in spoken language). However, that doesn't mean that they still don't fail to confuse people trying to learn the language, as even the most sound explanation might seem nonsensical when the original problem could be solved by, well... changing the language? Ah, let's leave this for the linguists to figure out and non-native speakers to be confused about, right?

#3

English Nonsense

RedBombX Report

HANS
Community Member
1 year ago

You just ruined the ending for me!

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#4

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

juice
Community Member
1 year ago

...oh

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#5

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

just-shower-thoughts Report

PyroarRanger
Community Member
1 year ago

Oh shit.

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#6

English Nonsense

tidywrities Report

SykesDaMan
Community Member
1 year ago

It took me a while to remember which one is positive and which one is negative between horriffic and terrfic...

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#7

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

apollinares Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

I feel you dude

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#8

English Nonsense

thinice41 Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

This is definitely really interesting!

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#9

English Nonsense

notmyname123007 Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

...what?

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#10

English Nonsense

cherlishPanda Report

So Dou
Community Member
1 year ago

We have the exact same word in french and with the same meaning ... others meaning too ;)

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#11

English Nonsense

saranowitz Report

Yoel Schvarcz
Community Member
1 year ago

In french it's called Double-V

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#12

English Nonsense

madamplease Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

English pronunciation was invented by Satan

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#13

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

bisexualgambit Report

Ben Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

Why would you call a cell phone a “handy” anyway??

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#14

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

tigerpellets Report

Dave Walker
Community Member
1 year ago

I laughed out loud at shiphassailed :D (Yes, I'm a Brit)

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#15

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

dailybadjokes Report

Ben Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

Excellent

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#16

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

mariadamsfoster Report

juice
Community Member
1 year ago

no one knows

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#17

English Nonsense

Vaxtin Report

Yoel Schvarcz
Community Member
1 year ago

c

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#18

English Nonsense

MooSaysCow Report

Ben Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

This is the oldest one in the book...

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#19

English Nonsense

Sherman_Beardman Report

queen...<3
Community Member
1 year ago

OMl when I was younger my friend and I had a lengthy discussion on this lol And yes, I am a native English speaker.

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#20

English Nonsense

qikipedia Report

ShareMusic
Community Member
1 year ago

"I before e except after C" is how I learned it in 6th grade. Except in "ancient" (which I later missed on the spelling test!).

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#21

English Nonsense

TweetSmarter Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

is it bad that I actually understood this?

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#22

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

HANS
Community Member
1 year ago

I'd rather not do either or do neither.

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#23

English Nonsense

volcanichamster Report

Steven Cook
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

I feel like slim chance still has some small chance while fat chance has no chance at all...

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#24

English Nonsense

Swibblestein Report

Bleh
Community Member
1 year ago

This made more sense than it should've

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#25

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

invite-me-to-your-memories Report

Piou
Community Member
1 year ago

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If you think that English is hard to spell then don't look at French. And it was just the first example coming to my mind. Without being the most intuitive language to spell, English is an easy one

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#26

English Nonsense

dylandipzz Report

Artex Gorilla
Community Member
1 year ago

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No, it's not. Slang means informal words mostly used in spoken language.

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#27

English Nonsense

_charlmorgan Report

Ben Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

Not really.

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#28

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

Tiny Dynamine
Community Member
1 year ago

Some things have no explanation. It's just how they've come to be.

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#29

English Nonsense

orangepek0e Report

Miztre
Community Member
1 year ago

And people will pronounce it Stefan.

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#30

English Nonsense

AdventurousMan Report

KatHat
Community Member
1 year ago

Because it used to be shortened to "frig" - I've read it in books, most memorably One Pair of Hands by Monica Dickens - and you tell me how that looks like it should be pronounced.

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#31

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

emblian Report

Tiny Dynamine
Community Member
1 year ago

I think this depends on what country you're from. It only means the second one in the UK.

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#32

English Nonsense

Marimelida Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

Because it has nothing to do with the words man/woman and comes from Latin humanus

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#33

English Nonsense

Djimmieboy Report

Full Name
Community Member
1 year ago

Where are they pronounced the same? Not in North America.

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#34

English Nonsense

Grammarly Report

Ben Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

And butchers don’t butch

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#35

English Nonsense

MundaneRiot Report

Full Name
Community Member
1 year ago

This comment is hidden. Click here to view.

Bad comparison because drinks are just different flavours or temperatures if the same thing. You can say soup to mean any soup, or sandwich for any sandwich.

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#36

English Nonsense

GabbieHanna Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

Because "Philippines" is in English while "Filipino/Filipina" is Spanish. No need to stress out. In Spanish the country is Filipinas. All is well, they're just words in two different languages!

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#37

English Nonsense

Unrelated96 Report

Yoel Schvarcz
Community Member
1 year ago

What about Middle-English?

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#38

English Nonsense

kanoe170 Report

Daria B
Community Member
1 year ago

One is AWful, the other is AWEsome. Maybe here lies the difference.

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#39

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

rudy_mustang Report

Tiny Dynamine
Community Member
1 year ago

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Balogna isn't even a word! I've heard and seen 'baloney' but if you google that one, it doesn't give any credible results.

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#40

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

Fiasko21 Report

Dynein
Community Member
1 year ago

Man's laughter and man slaughter...

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