Bored Panda works better on our iPhone app
Continue in app Continue in browser
BoredPanda Add Post

The Bored Panda iOS app is live! Fight boredom with iPhones and iPads here.

“If Any Personal Good Comes Out Of This Pandemic, It Is This: It’s Payback Time”: Danish Doctor Reveals She’s Excited To Be Able To Give Back To Her Country
80points
User submission
452
86.2K
People, Social Issues2 years ago

“If Any Personal Good Comes Out Of This Pandemic, It Is This: It’s Payback Time”: Danish Doctor Reveals She’s Excited To Be Able To Give Back To Her Country

John F. Kennedy once famously said: “Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country.” While these words have been used and reused to the point of banality, still, the saying rings true even in these days.

In these shaky and uncertain times, it’s easy to fall into a state of panic, blaming the people, the government, or the health officials. It is human nature that during a global pandemic that seems more and more threatening every day, we tend to overlook the good things and focus on the negative ones. Luckily for us, there are people out there who take time to share their optimistic and positive thoughts with the rest of us. One of these people is a Danish doctor, Emily Cathrine Wenande, whose recent Facebook post inspired not only Danes but the rest of the world as well.

More info: Facebook

This Danish doctor recently shared that she wants to give back to her country

Image credits: emilycathrinew

Denmark has proven itself to be a prosperous country socially as well as economically, which attracts a lot of immigrants both from Europe and other parts of the world. Denmark uses the Nordic model, which is comprised of economic and social policies that are typical to other Nordic countries as well (Finland, Iceland, Sweden, and Norway). The model includes a comprehensive welfare state and multi-level collective bargaining. A high percentage of the workforce is unionized while roughly 30% of the workforce is employed by the public sector.

As for healthcare, the Danish system is based on the principles of free and easily accessible care for all. Surprisingly or not, it has been ranked as 34th among the best in the world. “Several factors determine the level of healthcare quality in a particular country,” the World Population Review explains. Firstly, it’s the factor of the care process itself. Then, the accessibility is taken into consideration, and lastly—administrative efficiency, equity, and overall healthcare outcomes are measured when ranking countries (by the way, the U.S. was ranked 37th).

Free public healthcare for all Denmark’s citizens and residents allows them to access routine check-ups, examinations, specialist or emergency care, and home nursing for free. While there are some services—for example, dental care or psychotherapy— that aren’t covered for adults, the majority of them still are for people under 18. Then, there are some services such as medication or psychotherapy, that can be partially subsidized by the government.

In return for free healthcare, the Danes pay for them with their taxes with the country spending about 11 percent of its GDP on health care. While there are certain disadvantages to their public health system, a survey done last year shows that the majority of respondents were satisfied with the care they received and have confidence in the system in general.

During the global crisis, she says that it’s “payback time”

Image credits: emilycathrinew

Emily’s now-viral post has struck a chord with many people, especially Danes. Many were calling the doctor a “true hero” for viewing the current situation as an opportunity to give back to her country and its people. “Sending all of you in the front strength and endurance. Thanks for you guys,” one Danish person comments. “Thank you for this honest text which is true for most European social countries. It’s time to pay back or at least thank the elder generations for our wellbeing,” someone adds in English.

People were touched by Emily’s post

86Kviews

Share on Facebook
You May Like
Popular on Bored Panda
Write comments
plush n puppet shenanigans
Community Member
2 years ago

could someone clarify what she meant, i have asperger's syndrome and im confused by what she means.

Night Owl
Community Member
2 years ago

She meant that her country gave a lot to her and she is grateful for it. Now she has the opportunity to show that gratefulness and wants to give her country her best just like the country gave its best to her.

Load More Replies...
Lou Lopez
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

This kind of throws a monkey wrench into the GOP argument that "universal healthcare won't attract doctors because they won't make gobs of cash." Maybe if we didn't charge an arm and a leg for school we could have doctors who don't need to pay back thousands of dollars in debt. Honestly, I think that argument says more about the people who make it than it does anyone else. If those people were doctors they absolutely would allow patients to die in favor of making more money.

Razy Aman Eddine
Community Member
2 years ago

It wasn't JFK first to say “Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country”, but Lebanese poet Jobran Khalil Jobran. However, typically people would fill the politician than the artist.

Load More Comments
plush n puppet shenanigans
Community Member
2 years ago

could someone clarify what she meant, i have asperger's syndrome and im confused by what she means.

Night Owl
Community Member
2 years ago

She meant that her country gave a lot to her and she is grateful for it. Now she has the opportunity to show that gratefulness and wants to give her country her best just like the country gave its best to her.

Load More Replies...
Lou Lopez
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

This kind of throws a monkey wrench into the GOP argument that "universal healthcare won't attract doctors because they won't make gobs of cash." Maybe if we didn't charge an arm and a leg for school we could have doctors who don't need to pay back thousands of dollars in debt. Honestly, I think that argument says more about the people who make it than it does anyone else. If those people were doctors they absolutely would allow patients to die in favor of making more money.

Razy Aman Eddine
Community Member
2 years ago

It wasn't JFK first to say “Ask not what your country can do for you—ask what you can do for your country”, but Lebanese poet Jobran Khalil Jobran. However, typically people would fill the politician than the artist.

Load More Comments
Popular on Bored Panda
Popular on Bored Panda
User Submissions
Also on Bored Panda
Also on Bored Panda