In early March, I had a 2-week trip to India, right before the country lockdown due to the pandemic. That was so lucky me for the fact that I came back to Vietnam really on time. I was thinking of visiting Jodhpur, a so-called blue city in India for so long. As reaching there, this city did not fail to amaze me.

The blueness is not everywhere to be seen. Let’s take a stroll around the old town under the foothill of Mehrangarh Fort – a huge fort tourist can not miss in Jodhpur, and you can catch the sights of blue houses. The hue is varied, from Indigo, Cerulean, sky blue to Persian blue, or Cobalt hue. Don’t expect that the blue hue in Jodhpur is totally gorgeous like blue alleys in Chefchaouen. People paint their houses blue not for tourism purposes. Therefore, you can find them stained, filthy-ish, and the alleys are covered in cow wastes.

Try to meander along small alleys, take a leisure walk in the early morning when local people are still not awakened. It helps you have better views as your photos are not photobombed by anyone.

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An aerial view from a step taking me to the top of the hill

The color of the building is matched with the deep sky blue

You should visit Jodhpur and India in winter or spring for a clearer sky and bearable weather

A poetic blue gate and a crumbling wall

I tried to meander along the small alleys leading to the Fort. Closer to the foothill of the Fort lie more blue houses for travelers to explore

Local people are friendly and they have no problem if you take photo in front of their houses

Getting lost in the middle of blue alley seems pretty great in Jodhpur

Daily life keeps happening here with or without tourists who wander around to hunt for a great view of blue city

You can easily spot which is the bluest house in the area. Some house owners allow you to get up to their roof for photo and you have to pay a small amount of money

A summer vibe and tranquility is in the air