Have you ever wondered what our ancestors looked like during their time? An archaeologist who also works as a sculptor decided to recreate the faces of ancient people through sculptures. Amazingly, each lifelike face and its remarkable features are crafted by hand. science, archaeology, history, science, archaeology, science, history, science, archaeology, science, history, science

Oscar Nilsson is the Swedish archaeologist and sculptor who spends hundreds of hours reconstructing the faces of ancient humans. He uses 3D printed skulls based on the remains found in archaeological sites then painstakingly works on the features. His company OD Nilsson works with museums in an effort to give anonymous ancient folks a face that people today can relate to. Here are a few of Nilsson’s astounding works.

#1. The Huarmey Queen

Almost 1,200 years ago, a noblewoman was buried along with 57 others in coastal Peru. She stood out because her remains were found with several treasures so the archaeologists dubbed her the Huarmey Queen.

Although she spent most of her time sitting, the noblewoman spent most of that time weaving. It is believed that she was honored for her skills since she was buried with golden weaving tools. science, archaeology, history, science, archaeology, science, history, science, archaeology, science, history

#2. The Whitehawk Woman

The remains of the young Neolithic woman was found around Brighton in Sussex where it is believed that she died of childbirth. She was only 20 years old at the time.

The Whitehawk Woman is believed to be one of the ancestors of the current residents of Brighton and her DNA proves that she was not white… Show More

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