We think we know everything about our home planet, but we couldn’t be more wrong. Scientists have already discovered a lot about the Universe, but they believe there is still much more to discover about one particular planet.

We were so surprised to find out new amazing things about Earth that we decided to share them with you right away.

1. Mount Everest is NOT the tallest mountain in the world.

Hawaiian Mauna Kea has an altitude of 4,205 m above sea level. However, the biggest part of the volcano rests below sea level. So if measured from the base to the summit, Mauna Kea is 10,203 m high, which is 1,355 m taller than Mount Everest.

2. Earth’s atmosphere has borders.

The Kármán line is an internationally accepted line that lies at an altitude of 100 km above sea level. Although the level of Earth’s atmosphere ends much higher, this very line was recognized by The World Air Sports Federation as the boundary between the atmosphere and outer space.

3. The driest place on Earth is located in Antarctica.

It’s commonly believed that the driest place on Earth is the Atacama Desert in Chile that hasn’t had rainfall for thousands of years. But the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica have seen no rain for nearly 2 million years. The winds here can reach speeds of 320 km/h…Show More

science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science, science,