This is my series of street photography with photos from India, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, Singapore and Sri Lanka. I lacked the inspiration at the streets of Bucharest, so in spring of 2013 I decided to travel around Asia for a year.

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I first noticed phrase “same same, but different” printed on t-shirts in Thailand. It is often used by salesmen to persuade consumers to purchase knock-off merchandise. For instance, a buyer asking if the sunglasses are real Ray-Bans might hear the reply “same same but different.” While in Vietnam, I purchased a pair of sandals and after walking about 200 meters I decided to go back and exchange them for something more comfortable. The woman’s response to my request was “not same same.”

After researching this phrase, I found a German movie made in 2009 with the title “Same Same But Different.” Interestingly enough, the story takes place in Cambodia, the same region where this phrase kept on popping up for me. The great thing about this phrase is that it is applicable to almost everything in life – politics, relationships, education, entertainment… Life is a collective experience.

Although this idea of objects as same same but different seems to be tied closely to Asian culture and fashion, I also find it to be somewhat of a philosophical expression, suggesting that in essence people are all the same, yet so different.

More info: Behance